Olio – 11/7/2019

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things

We hired a contractor to do the log erection and rough carpentry on our retirement home. Our eldest and his family moved to the area to oversee that work and be our representative on site, eventually taking over the closed shell and doing all of the interior carpentry and interior and exterior stone work, including a very tall chimney from stone from our property. His wife worked with him, various student’s from the university, a cousin, even I assisted on parts I could do. All of his work is steller, open upper cabinetry, hand made doors, beautiful stone work. The contractor though wasn’t totally honest with him when he interviewed him and represented that he had built a log home before. Having never built a house before, we didn’t know whether to go with his flat estimate or go with cost plus. It turns out that with cost plus, if he worked, he paid himself so effectively getting paid twice. It also turned out that maybe he wasn’t quite as good as some aspects as he let on. One issue that we have had is leaks around roof vents, and one roof vent that failed due to sliding snow (not really his fault). We had snow strips added to the edges of the metal roof to slow down the slide, had that vent repaired, and the other vents resealed. Twice they have been resealed in the dozen years we have lived here and about 5 Christmas holiday’s ago, son tore down the dry wall soffit in the basement that we had only recently had finished by another contractor because of the leak. Son rebuilt the soffit with siding in a manner that I can quickly remove a panel to put a catch pan up there when the leaks begin. We recently after a long dry summer started having rain and a new leak. The panel was removed, the drip pan put in the ceiling, and roofing estimates gathered. That was frustrating as several roofers said they would come out and then called and said they couldn’t. One did come, he had been recommended by our daughter after she had to have her roof replaced after a wind storm, and he noted two issues. The vent stack boots were the type for asphalt shingle roofs, not metal ones and they were set in seams instead of between them. Two men climbed a very long ladder this morning, up on the three story part of the roof, loosened the metal panel where the two suspect vents were, and replaced the boots with the proper kind, sealed them with the proper kind of sealant (not silicone on a metal roof), and safely climbed back down before the afternoon rain. Hopefully the leak is stopped. I will monitor it through the next few rains before I screw the panel back in place.

Facebook denied my page name change for the third time with the same form letter. The page is gone. It will be difficult for me to leave Facebook entirely as I get notification from my re-enactment group and the museum where I volunteer through it, but I am going to become very inactive on it otherwise.

Last weekend, when my friend and I were demonstrating spinning in costume at Booker T. Washington National Monument, we were also allowed to vend. A gentleman approached and saw my hand spun, hand knitted fingerless mitts, realized I had a pair in men’s size, tried them on and liked them. He picked up a skein of hand spun yarn I had for sale and asked if it was possible for me to make him mitts from it. It is hard to turn down a request like that, but I really don’t like to knit the mitts from fingering weight yarn and the skein was fingering weight Coopworth with lots of color variation and texture. I have spent the week knitting the mitts two at a time so they will match.

I need about 1/2-3/4″ more of ribbing at the top and the thumbs and they should be on their way by the end of the weekend.

Saturday, I will don the Revolutionary War costume and demonstrate spinning at the Museum of Western Virginia for part of the day. It will be cold, again, but at least it will be indoors.

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