Tag Archives: Spinning

Olio 6/18/2019

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things.

Summer is nearly here, the hay stands tall, the ground wet, rain forecast nearly every day preventing the cutting, raking, and baling.  A few fields near us were done several weeks ago, others that will be done before they get to us are still standing too.  Since our brush hog mower fell apart last fall, areas that the riding mower can’t handle and that won’t be hayed due to trees they don’t want to work around, we can’t even mow those areas.  I can’t get to the berry patches as they are scattered along the edge of the woods by the hayfields.

Last week was spent helping daughter out with two of our grands.  With school out, babysitting help, camps, and trips keep the kids busy are needed for a working Mom.  Half of two of those days, there were activities that had been scheduled using my spinning and fiber history skills, and granddad had the kiddos.  The first morning was not in costume, about 25 camp kids rotated to try candle dipping, see spinning on a wheel and spindles and get a length of handspun yarn to take, watch the blacksmith, and see mini balls made on an open fire and then an old flintlock rifle fired without a ball.  Friday was Flag Day at Wilderness Road Regional Museum.  We had the same activities, minus the blacksmith, but with a Bobbin Lace maker in attendance and all in costumes.

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At events, I have been spinning some of the Jacob from one of the fleeces that I washed.  It has to be combed to spin which fascinates observers.
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With three fleeces, there will be plenty to knit a sweater when it is all done, but since it mostly gets done at events, that might be a while.

Because of the rain and not being at home, the garden hasn’t been getting the attention it needs.  About 10 days ago, I took the weed eater to the paths so I could get in to see what else was going on.  The asparagus are tall ferns now, and too many weeds in there, but too hard to get to.  Once the ferns are cut in the fall, it will be weeded and mulched with straw for the winter.  The tomatillos were planted through a thick straw mulch and are doing well.  The tomatoes and peppers were weeded and staked after the paths were done and need weeding again.  They need straw put down around them, but it doesn’t seem to be available in the area right now.  I can’t go rake leaves from the woods to use because I can’t get to the woods for the standing hay.  This afternoon, I went out to pick peas for dinner and realized that for the first time ever, the blueberries were heavy with fruit.  The bushes are still fairly small.  Though they are about 4 or 5 years old, they were not being kept weeded and last year, they were moved to a 4 x 8′ box on the edge of the garden, given a good layer of new soil, a sprinkle of bone meal, a layer of newspaper covered with several inches of wood chip mulch.  Though they have required some weeding, the weeds are mostly just in the mulch and the berries are thriving.

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After sorting the basket and shelling the peas, it looks like berries for cereal, muffins or quick bread, and a couple meals of peas.  There are many more peas to pick over the next few weeks.  The bush beans are blooming, and that bed got weeded as well this afternnon.  A second planting of them should be done soon.  I would have stayed out longer and worked, but the thunder storms started again.  The cucumbers are climbing the fence, the sunflowers are more than knee high, there are green Roma tomatoes, pumpkins vines developing.  The garden is small this year, some produce will come from the Farmers’ Market, but that has been the routine for several years now.  I hope the peppers begin to grow soon.  One that was planted is gone, none of them much larger than the transplants that I put in the ground.  I’ll have to check what is available for transplanting when I go to the Farmers’ Market next.

Slow down and enjoy time – 5/23/2019

With the two back to back events done, having completed spinning 15 breeds for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em for the Livestock Conservancy challenge, used 7 or maybe 8 of those breeds to knit the giant half Hap shawl.  With the B&B soap contract made and packaged, the 6 hanks of yarn spun, selected, banded, and packaged for the yarn shop. With the garden fully planted, staying more or less on top of the weeds and the mowing, it is time to slow down and enjoy some slower moving times.

Not idle, but not so frenetic.  Last fall, I purchased a felter’s pack of 5 pure  1 ounce each Alpaca bumps or roving in natural colors from white to black.  I think they were designated as felter’s  pack because there is a fair amount of vegetable matter in the roving, but easy enough to pick out.  I am spinning it very fine with the idea of making 5 lace weight mini skeins that can be knit into a gradient shawl.  I have lots of the fawn color and the black color separately, so it could be a very large gradient shawl with narrower bands of the white and two grays.  There is no rush on this, I can take as long as I want.   The mini skeins of Alpaca will probably be listed in my shop or sold at a retreat or festival.  The extra 4 ounces of light gray Shetland that I ordered, fearing I was playing chicken on the Hap arrived and though I really like spinning it fine, I think I am going to force myself to spin it a heavier weight and use some of the remaining Black Welsh Mountain yarn to make several pair of mittens for the winter markets.

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Some time ago, I designed a hat pattern with a lacy band while knitting a hat for the shop.

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Hats, fingerless mitts, mittens, and cowls are easy to carry in my bag to have handy when there is down time, being a passenger in a vehicle, or just want to do a few rows at a time.  They can be made with no more than a single skein of yarn, often with just left over scraps or mini skeins.  My pattern designs are printed out and available for sale at events or free with the purchase of a skein of yarn.  I even have a hat kit that comes with a skein of choice, a 16″ circular  knitting needle, a darning needle, and the pattern.  I really liked the lace look of the hat and decided to design a companion cowl to go with it.  It is one of my current go-along knits.  That pattern will be added to my collection at some future time.

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The other go-along knit is a pair of fingerless mitts made with the leftover skein from knitting one of our granddaughter’s a sweater for her first birthday.

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They are fairly thin and will only fit a smaller hand, I can barely put them on, but the colors are pretty and will make a nice fall or spring pair.

There are no large projects in the works, but yarn has been selected for another 5 foot tri loom shawl soon.  It is too hot to have large heavy knits in my lap.

And in the coop, there is still a 6 month old hen who thinks she is going to sit on eggs that are infertile with no rooster in their midst.  I run her off the nest several times a day, taking any eggs that have been laid in the interim and block off the nesting boxes at night.  With only 9 hens, having one not laying is putting a dent in my supply.

No Rest for the Retired – 5/20/2019

The past couple of weeks have been a whirlwind.  There have been two Saturdays occupied by events, the first an Artisan Fair to benefit the scholarship program at Creative Therapy Care.  It was a hot, rainy day, but well attended, good music, lots of beautiful art.  This  past Saturday, in Rev War costume, I was spinning, relating spinning and fiber art information, representing Wilderness Road Regional Museum and the local militia group that I sometimes set up with.  Again it was hot, but not rainy for this Riner Heritage Day event.  I did set up a small table vending soap and yarn for this as well.  This event was fun, as a History teacher offered extra credit to students who would approach one of the re-enactors, ask a pertinent question or listen to our spiel and then have their picture taken with us.  I had at least a dozen young adults approach me, listen to my talk, have their photo taken, and thank me.  One young man brought at least 4 of them over to me.

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Between those events, work has been directed toward the garden, especially in the early morning before it gets hot.  Everything planted is up except for the pumpkins.  I guess I will have to try again on them before it is too late.  There is a nice row of cucumbers sprouted, two rows of sunflowers and Hopi Dyeseed sunflowers, the tomatoes and peppers need mulch and it is a daily battle against the lambs quarters in the onions, asparagus, and peas.  The only harvest is still asparagus, but I am getting my fill and passing some on to others.

Also, two skeins of yarn have been finished that will go to The Yarn Asylum in Jonesborough, TN along with several others soon.  And the 97 little guest bars of soap were made, and wrapped for Franklin House Bed and Breakfast also in Jonesborough, TN.  These goodies will be delivered back by friends coming here for a day of spinning, camaraderie, and food at an annual event hosted by mutual friends.

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At night and during a couple of cooler days, I finished knitting the half Hap shawl that I was making with 7 of the breeds of wool I spun for the Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em challenge.  It ended up almost 6 feet wide and 3 feet deep.  Every one of the 87 lace points had to be pulled and pinned during the blocking.  It is lovely, and heavy.  I will probably enter it in the Fair this year and then enjoy it’s warmth when the weather cools next fall and winter.

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My pullets are all laying consistently sized eggs finally after getting a double yolked “ostrich” egg from one of the other each day.  One Oliver egger has decided to be broody.  I have never had a first year hen go broody on me, but that means one less egg each day and I am having to remove her from the nest several times a day and every evening.

A few weeks ago, I planted Calendula plants for the flowers for soaps and salves.  The plants are blooming and I am gathering the blooms and drying them for later use.  I need to find a patch of Broadleaf Plantain that isn’t in the animal’s footpath or our footpath as that is another herb that needs to be gathered and infused for a fresh batch of salves.  My lavender plant didn’t get pruned two years ago and last year’s pruning didn’t improve it.  I guess it will be dug up and a new one or two purchased so that it too can be dried and infused.

Each day we are taking a 2 plus mile walk together.  We have several places we visit and get our exercise.  Some days it is very pleasant, others it is hot and difficult.

Tomorrow is supposed to be cooler, maybe the yard will get mowed.  The hay stand is tall and awaiting the annual mowing and baling.

What is my worth? 5/3/2019

Last summer or fall, my eldest did two pages of calculations to determine about what it was costing me per bar to make my soaps.  This came right after I did a craft event where I was one of about 5 or 6 people that had hand crafted soap, some selling for as little as $3 per bar.  At that rate of sale, they are barely making back the materials cost.  I do try to use as many organic ingredients as I can obtain and that increases my cost some, but I can’t sell my soap for $3 per bar and get paid anything for my time to make, package, pay booth fee, Virginia sales tax, and time spent at the event selling.  A couple of weekends ago, I was at a re-enactment event and was told I could vend.  There was another spinner/soap maker there that was local and not in Rev War costume and her soaps were $3.50 per bar.  I didn’t check her knit hat prices.  Neither of us sold anything that day.

Very low price handcrafted items devalues other craftsmen.

I know my hand spun, hand knit prices have been too low, so I did a bit of research to see what similar items are listed for on Etsy.  I don’t know if they actually sell, but the prices for hats with bulky yarn are listed for nearly double my prices for items hand spun, hand knit with fingering to dk weight yarn.  I decided to time myself spinning and then knitting a pair of fingerless mitts.  It takes me almost 5 hours to spin, ply, and wash 4 ounces of wool roving, longer if I have to wash the fleece, dry it, comb or card it to use.  It take me another 5 hours to knit a pair of fingerless mitts, probably a bit less to do a hat, again from fingering to dk weight yarn.  I use about half a skein for the mitts, so 2.5 hours, plus 5 hours is 7 to 8 hours of my time.  If I price them at a wage of $5 per hour, not counting the cost of the roving or fleece, no one will buy them.

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A real craftsman can not compete with foreign sweatshop made prices.

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Most of my hand knit items are from patterns that I developed, not patterns I have found online.  That adds more hours to the project.  It is difficult to compare apples to oranges, when another vendor is knitting or crocheting bulky acrylic yarn into hats and cowls while I am spinning wool to a fine yarn and knitting.  I know I am worth the price that a hand crafted item should sell for, but my stock accumulates.  Next weekend, I will participate in a first year Artisan event.  The artists that have been featured are true artists, I hope it is a success for us all.

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Olio-4/7/2019

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things

This week has drifted by in a dizzy dream.  It brought two Doctor’s visits,  First to the G.P. as fairly constant headache and periodic bouts of dizziness that began after our accident have continued to plague me.  This visit they confirmed that I indeed suffered a concussion in the accident and have Post Concussive Syndrome.  As I already had an eye appointment scheduled for Friday, they gave me a prescription to help with the headache and dizziness, but it just makes me want to sleep and dizziness and hypotension are side effects, so how is it supposed to help with dizziness if it causes dizziness.  BPPV therapy may be in order down the road.

The eye Doctor visit showed enough change in my prescription in a year to warrant new glasses, some increased cataract in my left eye which could be concussion caused or just time related, but not enough to do anything about it, but I failed the eye to brain testing, so more testing and possible therapy as well.  I’m pretty much over it.  Tomorrow is 2 months since we were hit.

As being on the computer, reading, and bending down all trigger the dizziness, I have not been on the computer much and really want to get the garden ready, but have to pick “good” days and limit my bending.

Spinning and knitting don’t seem to bother me, perhaps because the current knitting project is garter stitch and Old Shale Lace which is almost as mindless, so I don’t have to constantly look at it.

The shawl is a half Shetland Hap, but is being knit with the yarns I have spun for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em.

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For my spinning, I have been washing, then combing and spinning a little Jacob raw fleece.  The skein I have worked on this week is the darker colors pulled out and spun separately.

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Last weekend, one of my reenactor friends that works with leather made scabbards to protect my baskets and self from the sharp tines of my wool combs when I am carrying them to events.

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This week, some of the soap from the many batches was packaged and delivered to two of the local museums for sale there.

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About midweek, one of the Olive Egger pullets began to lay, in 4 days we have gotten 3 tiny pullet eggs.  The photo shows one compared to a brown egg from the Farmers’ Market.

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The week has been mild, with some rain on Friday and more due this evening and tomorrow, but last night was nice enough to grill out and eat on the new deck.  A pleasure that I missed while the deck was down.  Ranger and I spend a part of most days sitting in the sun back there.  Soon it will be summer and too hot to sit there and we will move to the shaded front porch, but for now it is delightful.

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Life goes on here in the mountains. For the time being, posting on the computer will be infrequent, but we are improving.

History Day – March 20, 2019

Today was a history day.  A local elementary school brought their 5th graders to Wilderness Road Regional Museum for a field trip.

When I first started doing living history, I had no costume and didn’t want to spend a fortune on one.  At the time I was spinning a castle style wheel and spun in my stocking feet, so shoes were not an issue.  I bought a petticoat and shift from Etsy, later a kerchief, mob cap, and bodice also from Etsy and I was okay with the look as was the venue where I did most of my events.  I had gotten a bed gown from Ebay, but it really didn’t fit well and is heavy, so not good in hot weather, so I rarely wore it.  Then I joined a local Rev War militia group and my costume needed tweeking.  My petticoat was a checkered pattern cotton with a gathered waist (wrong print, fabric, and style), the shift really isn’t quite the right style, the kerchief is the wrong fabric, and the bodice is a no-no.  To work on upgrading, I purchased a couple yards of navy linen and made the pleated petticoat, it really feels better than the yards of gathered cotton.  Another half yard of natural colored linen was hand hemmed into a proper kerchief.  The bedgown was dragged out, adjusted a bit (plus I’ve lost some weight), so it was wearable.  A new handmade shift is on order from a sutler, but you can’t see it under my gown and kerchief so I went with the old one today.  The other items that needed upgrade are shoes which were ordered, but not available for 60-90 days, so my Berkeley style slipper shoes with rubber soles will have to do for now; and glasses.  My glasses are the wrong shape and size and my prescription won’t work in the small round shape that is period correct.  I can function without them if I don’t have to drive, operate machinery, or read, so I will just go without.  Somewhere along the way at an event, I purchased the flat shallow straw hat that is period correct and adorned it with a handwoven tape.

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This morning, all decked out with spindle wheel, baskets of breed samples and ID cards, fiber, wool combs and cards, lucets, box loom, and knitting I set up at the museum in the outdoor kitchen.  Also outside of the museum were a militia reenacter with his kit, making mini balls over his fire and firing off his muskets, and a blacksmith.  The 4 groups of kids saw a film in the museum, walked over to the old jail, spent time with each of the demonstration stations.  The kids were awesome and though the outdoor kitchen was chilly, there were breaks where I could sit in the sun and warm my fingers.

The more I do this, the more I learn from using different equipment to the history and the better I become at drawing in the audience with questions and discussion, not a lecture.  The fiber arts are fascinating, the area is ripe with history, and the audience, especially kids are awed when they realize that household linens and goods, as well as clothing were hand spun and hand woven prior to the advent of the spinning and weaving mills, and really how recently in history that was.

What an exciting and delightful experience this has become.

Olio – 3/9/2019

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things

Last weekend was the twice a year Fiber Retreat that I attend each February/March.  The group was a bit smaller this time, but the company was fun, the food was good (they finally got a restaurant manager that knows what she is doing), and it was a pretty good vending event.

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I came home with a Jacob pelt to sit on, especially when I am on a hard chair at Living history events or retreats.

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Additionally, I came home with a gift of 5 raw fleeces, two are Jacobs, one of my new favorites from Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em.  Some of the fleeces are going to be shared with a friend that raises Mohair goats, but at least one Jacob is going to be processed by me when I finish spinning my 15 breeds.

Prior to leaving, a new found social media friend and I were talking and she makes felted hats among other things.  Several years ago, I walked away at SAFF from a felted hat that I adored and have regretted it since.  Friend says she can make me one.  Some back and forth over style and color and since I wanted to use one of my woven tapes for the hat band, a price was set and this arrived shortly  after my return.

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What fun to wear.  Such a great purchase.

The week has been spent continuing to recover from our auto accident.  We each had another visit with our physician and each had another orthopedic manipulation done to try to loosen up the tight soreness from the whiplash and another discussion about how long the brain fog, headaches, and dizziness when I bend down will last from the concussion.  It is such a hassle to deal with the discomfort and all the insurance issues when we were not at fault.  The car is in the shop and is supposed to be ready by Monday afternoon more than a month after the accident.

The week has also been spent doing some spinning, finishing two more breeds for the challenge and spinning up a “black” Rambouilett Dorset few ounces and an orange Coopworth few ounces that I had planned to ply together, but didn’t like the way the sample looked knitted, so they were plyed on themselves.  The other two spun were Tunis, originally from Tunisia, and Black Welsh Mountain originally from Wales.  The Black Welsh Mountain is on the threatened list and the Tunis is on the watch list from the Livestock Conservancy.

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Currently I am spinning Hog Island, origin Britian and US and Florida Cracker, origin Spain, both on the critical list.  My last breed to make 15 is going to be Cotswold and it is on it’s way to me via mail.

Yesterday we awoke to it snowing and though the roads never really got bad, we had a few inches.  Some of the daylilies had broken ground and their tender tips got burned.  They will recover with spring thinking about making it’s way to the mountains.  The Autumn Joy didn’t seem to mind the snow.

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For the past couple of months, the kitchen sink drain has been sluggish.  I have tried all of the “natural” cures, baking soda and vinegar; washing soda and boiling water to no avail.  Last night while cleaning up from dinner, it didn’t drain and sat with a couple of inches of water in it all night.  This morning, I poured a cup or so of vinegar into the standing water and we went out to breakfast and the Farmers’ Market.  On the way home, a stop at the hardware store and a 15′ drain snake was purchased.

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Though I have done other plumbing repairs including removing a toilet, clearing it and reinstalling it with a new wax ring when our youngest (now in his 30s) tried to flush a Burger King Capital Critter unsuccessfully), installing a new garbage disposal in a house about 30 years ago, clearing P traps and tub drains, this was my first experience with the snake, fortunately not requiring any real contortions due to continued soreness.  There is now one in the house for future use and I feel more confident in its use.

Old Dog, New Tricks – 3/4/2019

The saying goes that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.  I am trying to prove that adage incorrect.

One of the breeds that I ordered for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em was raw Florida Cracker.  Not having much success in the past with raw fiber, I was determined and watched several YouTube videos, talked with some more experienced folks and tackled the job.  Four washings, several rinses, a good drying, and I had a box full of locks with lots of tips that were tightly and stiffly bound together.

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I don’t own combs or a drum carder, just hand cards and a blending board with an extra flicker brush.

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Last night, I tackled the box and started producing rolags.  Now mind you, I am no expert with the hand carders, I “use” them when doing demonstrations for living history as a spinner, usually only having roving on hand and pretending to prepare the wool into rolags from which I then spin.

My first card full left me with hard tips still in the rolag, FAIL.  Then I started opening the tips with the flicker, turning the lock around to loosen the cut end and filling the carder.  I was producing rolags, not very pretty, but usable.

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The fiber releasing quite a bit of grit as I card it, but is spinning into a nice even relatively fine singles.  The finished yarn is going to need not just a soak after finishing, but a good wash.

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I think my next fiber preparation equipment is going to be combs.

Lesson learned is that you can teach an old dog new tricks, but more practice is needed.  I have a raw Jacob fleece awaiting my new skills.

Fiber and Fun – 3/3/2019

This was the weekend of the February fiber retreat at Hawk’s Nest.  I went as a participant and as a vendor with soaps, salves, lotion bars, yarn, antler buttons, hand dyed Merino top, knitted, and woven wearables.  This retreat is held at the lodge of a state park in West Virginia, about 2 hours from home if I don’t stop on the way.  It is a meeting of friends, lots of spinning and knitting time, socialization as we craft together, dine together, and have social hour before dinner.

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I took several of the fibers for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em and worked on producing yarn from part of the 10 ounces of Tunis and spun some Rambouillet Dorset wool just for a change and I think it will be plyed with the orange when it is all spun.

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I haven’t spun enough of the Tunis to report it yet, nor have I finished all of the Rambouliett Dorset and need to spin the orange.  I don’t know what that 8 ounces of yarn will become when done, perhaps a woven shawl.

My only purchase was a Jacob pelt to pad my chair or warm my feet.  Such a soft lovely little pelt from Hearts of the Meadow Farm.

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It was a rainy drive home, but the car is unloaded, though not all put away.  Most of the accounting has been performed.  Once I am ready to spin some tonight, I will work on flicking, carding, and spinning this box of washed Florida Cracker locks.  When it and the Tunis are done, breeds 11 and 12 will be reported to SE2SE.

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I had a delightful weekend in a nice room with a bed just for me, all the amenities I could desire, but it will be nice to be home in my own bed tonight.

Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em – 2/7/2019

I am a spinner, both drop spindle and on one of my 4 wheels that range from ancient to less than a year old.  I started spinning about a decade ago only on drop spindles and using easy to spin, clean, dyed wool and silk.  My knowledge of wool was that it came from sheep, little did I know how many different breeds of sheep there were and how different the properties of their wool varied.  Along the way, I did get introduced to Alpaca and helped with a couple of shearings, being rewarded with some of the fiber to spin.  Alpaca lacks the lanolin of sheep wool and is easier to clean and can be spun directly from the dirty locks and then washed as yarn.  But I prefer wool and have had my preference for the breeds that I spun.

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A couple of years ago, there was a new vendor at the weekly Farmer’s Market and she had yarn and roving as part of her goods.  The wool was a breed I had not spun, in fact, had never heard of and I made a new friend and learned about the breed that was on the Livestock Conservation list, Leicester Longwool.  I enjoyed spinning the wool I bought from her sheep being raised locally.  I have been to their farm, visited with their critters last spring when there were lambs bouncing around and one little beauty being bottle fed as she had been rejected by her mom.

This friend asked me this past late summer if I had any interest in participating in a project that the Livestock Conservancy was putting together that would allow using fiber from threatened sheep breeds.  This was perfect timing as there was so much contention with the anti wool ads that were being publicized. I said yes and she said she would share the information when it was getting going.  She did, the idea that you purchase a minimum of 4 ounces of wool or yarn, spin, knit, crochet, needle felt, or otherwise produce something with the wool.  When the wool is purchased, you get a sticker, and that sticker goes into a passport book that you get for registering as a fiber artist with the program.  The program is scheduled for three years and to earn a prize, you have to use at least 5 of the 22 Conservation Priority breeds.  I fell in hard and immediately ordered several wools I had never spun and finished the first 3 before I could even officially register to get my passport.

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The first three I spun were Jacob, Navajo Churro, and Shetland.  Shetland is the only one I had previously handled.  I enjoyed all three of these, really falling in love with Jacob.  As I started the fourth, Karakul, they opened the registration and I quickly sent my $15 to get the passport, a lapel pin, and more information which I am anxiously awaiting the arrival.

Last night I finished the Karakul, an ancient Asian breed that as lambs have a decent fleece, it is a primitive breed with a double coat and as they age, the coat often gets fairly coarse.  It is the wool of Persian rugs.  The Karakul 4 ounces was interesting to spin, feeling much like spinning flax or a horse’s tail, but the whole purpose of this is to experience the different breeds and to support them as they are all in need of conservation.

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Many of the fiber providers offer a breed card with information on the breed and how to spin it and some have offered small samples from a sheep of the same breed, but a different color than the one ordered.  I am using the card to hold a bit of unspun fiber, a bit of spun yarn, and either using the sample to make a mini skein or just winding off a few yards of the spun yarn to make a mini skein that I will be able to use when I do demonstrations or teach camps to show the different textures and natural colors of these Conservation Priority breeds.

My fifth breed, Romeldale CVM is currently being spun.  In my basket are Tunis, Clun Forest, Leicester Longwood (from my friend), Gulf Coast Native (which is raw and has to be washed and carded but also from a local farm), and on order is Lincoln.

My goal is to try to obtain and spin all 22 breeds within the three years.  The ones that aren’t so coarse that they must be felted or made into rugs, will be knitted into a blanket, probably a log cabin blanket for our log home.

Supporting this endeavor, the shepherds that raise these sheep, and helping to dispel the horrible inaccurate ads that shearing is wrong is such a delight.  Thank you shepherds for keeping my wheels and hands busy and helping the public see that fleece comes from a sheep, not a roll of plastic cloth.