Tag Archives: knitting

Slow down and enjoy time – 5/23/2019

With the two back to back events done, having completed spinning 15 breeds for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em for the Livestock Conservancy challenge, used 7 or maybe 8 of those breeds to knit the giant half Hap shawl.  With the B&B soap contract made and packaged, the 6 hanks of yarn spun, selected, banded, and packaged for the yarn shop. With the garden fully planted, staying more or less on top of the weeds and the mowing, it is time to slow down and enjoy some slower moving times.

Not idle, but not so frenetic.  Last fall, I purchased a felter’s pack of 5 pure  1 ounce each Alpaca bumps or roving in natural colors from white to black.  I think they were designated as felter’s  pack because there is a fair amount of vegetable matter in the roving, but easy enough to pick out.  I am spinning it very fine with the idea of making 5 lace weight mini skeins that can be knit into a gradient shawl.  I have lots of the fawn color and the black color separately, so it could be a very large gradient shawl with narrower bands of the white and two grays.  There is no rush on this, I can take as long as I want.   The mini skeins of Alpaca will probably be listed in my shop or sold at a retreat or festival.  The extra 4 ounces of light gray Shetland that I ordered, fearing I was playing chicken on the Hap arrived and though I really like spinning it fine, I think I am going to force myself to spin it a heavier weight and use some of the remaining Black Welsh Mountain yarn to make several pair of mittens for the winter markets.

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Some time ago, I designed a hat pattern with a lacy band while knitting a hat for the shop.

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Hats, fingerless mitts, mittens, and cowls are easy to carry in my bag to have handy when there is down time, being a passenger in a vehicle, or just want to do a few rows at a time.  They can be made with no more than a single skein of yarn, often with just left over scraps or mini skeins.  My pattern designs are printed out and available for sale at events or free with the purchase of a skein of yarn.  I even have a hat kit that comes with a skein of choice, a 16″ circular  knitting needle, a darning needle, and the pattern.  I really liked the lace look of the hat and decided to design a companion cowl to go with it.  It is one of my current go-along knits.  That pattern will be added to my collection at some future time.

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The other go-along knit is a pair of fingerless mitts made with the leftover skein from knitting one of our granddaughter’s a sweater for her first birthday.

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They are fairly thin and will only fit a smaller hand, I can barely put them on, but the colors are pretty and will make a nice fall or spring pair.

There are no large projects in the works, but yarn has been selected for another 5 foot tri loom shawl soon.  It is too hot to have large heavy knits in my lap.

And in the coop, there is still a 6 month old hen who thinks she is going to sit on eggs that are infertile with no rooster in their midst.  I run her off the nest several times a day, taking any eggs that have been laid in the interim and block off the nesting boxes at night.  With only 9 hens, having one not laying is putting a dent in my supply.

No Rest for the Retired – 5/20/2019

The past couple of weeks have been a whirlwind.  There have been two Saturdays occupied by events, the first an Artisan Fair to benefit the scholarship program at Creative Therapy Care.  It was a hot, rainy day, but well attended, good music, lots of beautiful art.  This  past Saturday, in Rev War costume, I was spinning, relating spinning and fiber art information, representing Wilderness Road Regional Museum and the local militia group that I sometimes set up with.  Again it was hot, but not rainy for this Riner Heritage Day event.  I did set up a small table vending soap and yarn for this as well.  This event was fun, as a History teacher offered extra credit to students who would approach one of the re-enactors, ask a pertinent question or listen to our spiel and then have their picture taken with us.  I had at least a dozen young adults approach me, listen to my talk, have their photo taken, and thank me.  One young man brought at least 4 of them over to me.

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Between those events, work has been directed toward the garden, especially in the early morning before it gets hot.  Everything planted is up except for the pumpkins.  I guess I will have to try again on them before it is too late.  There is a nice row of cucumbers sprouted, two rows of sunflowers and Hopi Dyeseed sunflowers, the tomatoes and peppers need mulch and it is a daily battle against the lambs quarters in the onions, asparagus, and peas.  The only harvest is still asparagus, but I am getting my fill and passing some on to others.

Also, two skeins of yarn have been finished that will go to The Yarn Asylum in Jonesborough, TN along with several others soon.  And the 97 little guest bars of soap were made, and wrapped for Franklin House Bed and Breakfast also in Jonesborough, TN.  These goodies will be delivered back by friends coming here for a day of spinning, camaraderie, and food at an annual event hosted by mutual friends.

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At night and during a couple of cooler days, I finished knitting the half Hap shawl that I was making with 7 of the breeds of wool I spun for the Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em challenge.  It ended up almost 6 feet wide and 3 feet deep.  Every one of the 87 lace points had to be pulled and pinned during the blocking.  It is lovely, and heavy.  I will probably enter it in the Fair this year and then enjoy it’s warmth when the weather cools next fall and winter.

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My pullets are all laying consistently sized eggs finally after getting a double yolked “ostrich” egg from one of the other each day.  One Oliver egger has decided to be broody.  I have never had a first year hen go broody on me, but that means one less egg each day and I am having to remove her from the nest several times a day and every evening.

A few weeks ago, I planted Calendula plants for the flowers for soaps and salves.  The plants are blooming and I am gathering the blooms and drying them for later use.  I need to find a patch of Broadleaf Plantain that isn’t in the animal’s footpath or our footpath as that is another herb that needs to be gathered and infused for a fresh batch of salves.  My lavender plant didn’t get pruned two years ago and last year’s pruning didn’t improve it.  I guess it will be dug up and a new one or two purchased so that it too can be dried and infused.

Each day we are taking a 2 plus mile walk together.  We have several places we visit and get our exercise.  Some days it is very pleasant, others it is hot and difficult.

Tomorrow is supposed to be cooler, maybe the yard will get mowed.  The hay stand is tall and awaiting the annual mowing and baling.

What is my worth? 5/3/2019

Last summer or fall, my eldest did two pages of calculations to determine about what it was costing me per bar to make my soaps.  This came right after I did a craft event where I was one of about 5 or 6 people that had hand crafted soap, some selling for as little as $3 per bar.  At that rate of sale, they are barely making back the materials cost.  I do try to use as many organic ingredients as I can obtain and that increases my cost some, but I can’t sell my soap for $3 per bar and get paid anything for my time to make, package, pay booth fee, Virginia sales tax, and time spent at the event selling.  A couple of weekends ago, I was at a re-enactment event and was told I could vend.  There was another spinner/soap maker there that was local and not in Rev War costume and her soaps were $3.50 per bar.  I didn’t check her knit hat prices.  Neither of us sold anything that day.

Very low price handcrafted items devalues other craftsmen.

I know my hand spun, hand knit prices have been too low, so I did a bit of research to see what similar items are listed for on Etsy.  I don’t know if they actually sell, but the prices for hats with bulky yarn are listed for nearly double my prices for items hand spun, hand knit with fingering to dk weight yarn.  I decided to time myself spinning and then knitting a pair of fingerless mitts.  It takes me almost 5 hours to spin, ply, and wash 4 ounces of wool roving, longer if I have to wash the fleece, dry it, comb or card it to use.  It take me another 5 hours to knit a pair of fingerless mitts, probably a bit less to do a hat, again from fingering to dk weight yarn.  I use about half a skein for the mitts, so 2.5 hours, plus 5 hours is 7 to 8 hours of my time.  If I price them at a wage of $5 per hour, not counting the cost of the roving or fleece, no one will buy them.

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A real craftsman can not compete with foreign sweatshop made prices.

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Most of my hand knit items are from patterns that I developed, not patterns I have found online.  That adds more hours to the project.  It is difficult to compare apples to oranges, when another vendor is knitting or crocheting bulky acrylic yarn into hats and cowls while I am spinning wool to a fine yarn and knitting.  I know I am worth the price that a hand crafted item should sell for, but my stock accumulates.  Next weekend, I will participate in a first year Artisan event.  The artists that have been featured are true artists, I hope it is a success for us all.

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Olio-4/7/2019

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things

This week has drifted by in a dizzy dream.  It brought two Doctor’s visits,  First to the G.P. as fairly constant headache and periodic bouts of dizziness that began after our accident have continued to plague me.  This visit they confirmed that I indeed suffered a concussion in the accident and have Post Concussive Syndrome.  As I already had an eye appointment scheduled for Friday, they gave me a prescription to help with the headache and dizziness, but it just makes me want to sleep and dizziness and hypotension are side effects, so how is it supposed to help with dizziness if it causes dizziness.  BPPV therapy may be in order down the road.

The eye Doctor visit showed enough change in my prescription in a year to warrant new glasses, some increased cataract in my left eye which could be concussion caused or just time related, but not enough to do anything about it, but I failed the eye to brain testing, so more testing and possible therapy as well.  I’m pretty much over it.  Tomorrow is 2 months since we were hit.

As being on the computer, reading, and bending down all trigger the dizziness, I have not been on the computer much and really want to get the garden ready, but have to pick “good” days and limit my bending.

Spinning and knitting don’t seem to bother me, perhaps because the current knitting project is garter stitch and Old Shale Lace which is almost as mindless, so I don’t have to constantly look at it.

The shawl is a half Shetland Hap, but is being knit with the yarns I have spun for Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em.

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For my spinning, I have been washing, then combing and spinning a little Jacob raw fleece.  The skein I have worked on this week is the darker colors pulled out and spun separately.

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Last weekend, one of my reenactor friends that works with leather made scabbards to protect my baskets and self from the sharp tines of my wool combs when I am carrying them to events.

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This week, some of the soap from the many batches was packaged and delivered to two of the local museums for sale there.

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About midweek, one of the Olive Egger pullets began to lay, in 4 days we have gotten 3 tiny pullet eggs.  The photo shows one compared to a brown egg from the Farmers’ Market.

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The week has been mild, with some rain on Friday and more due this evening and tomorrow, but last night was nice enough to grill out and eat on the new deck.  A pleasure that I missed while the deck was down.  Ranger and I spend a part of most days sitting in the sun back there.  Soon it will be summer and too hot to sit there and we will move to the shaded front porch, but for now it is delightful.

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Life goes on here in the mountains. For the time being, posting on the computer will be infrequent, but we are improving.

Fiber Fun – Jan. 17, 2019

The past few days have been stay in and play with fluff days.  With one of the fiber retreats coming up in late February, I decided to dye some of the Merino that I acquired last summer after jointly sending two fleeces off  for processing.  Using my soap pots and food safe dye, I dyed three 4 oz braids.  Today they were dry and labelled.

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With them is a 205 yard skein of  Merino/Alpaca yarn that I spun that will go with 2 other 200+ yard skeins.  There are 3 more braids of Merino and one of Cormo to dye.  All of these will be for sale at the retreat.

Yesterday, two of my wheels, a bag and basket of fiber, tools, and drop spindles made by me were hauled over to Wilderness Road Regional Museum.  The museum is closed in the winter except for appointments, but three of the volunteers had been asking for spinning lessons and I went to provide some instruction.  They were each given a length of roving and a drop spindle and started on some basic drafting and spinning techniques after some wool sampling. They were then given the opportunity to work with one of the wheels, the walking wheel that I repaired there and my wheels.

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It was a fun time, spreading the knowledge.  After the lesson, another of the great wheels in the museum was repaired by me, so now two of the wheels there are functional.  A spindle has been ordered by me to repair the third walking wheel displayed there.  Having three functional great wheels there will mean I don’t have to haul mine over there for events.

Today, the ice from last weekend’s storm had mostly melted away, except for sheltered and shaded areas, like right in front of our garage, so we left to run errands and get groceries.  While we were out it started to snow again and the predicted trace was rapidly accumulating.

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We got home to this around 2:30 p.m. and by dark there were several inches on the ground and wintery mix to top it overnight.  We may awake tomorrow to a repeat of the weekend.  Sunday is supposed to start in the low 40’s and fall all day to 7ºf with a very cold Monday.

Recently, I signed up for a three year program called Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em, a project to promote threatened, endangered breeds of sheep.  Shepherds that raise those breeds join and sell fleece, processed fiber, or yarn and fiber artists spin, knit, crochet, felt, weave at least 4 ounces of as many of the breeds as they can obtain. I ordered 4 ounces of Jacob roving, a threatened breed from Hobbyknob Farm.  It arrived today and I spun the 1 ounce tri color part of it this evening.

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There is a 3 ounce bump of gray roving to spin.  The Tri color spun to 64 yards of delightful fingering weight yarn.  Once the gray is spun, both will be knit into Fingerless mitts and a hat.

Today, I ordered 4 ounces of Romeldale CVM, another threatened breed from Marushka Farm.  It is fun to explore spinning and knitting some breeds that I have not previously used and supporting the continuation of these breeds.

Tomorrow, if the weather conditions and roads permit, we will drive back to Wytheville and I will put leathers and a drive band on the Great Wheel at the Edith Bolling Wilson Museum and try to get it functional.

A Month on the Farm – 12/20/2018

Tomorrow marks the first official day of winter and the shortest day of the year here on the farm, though the meteorologic winter began weeks ago.  I’m ready for the days to lengthen.  Being much a creature of natural light cycles, I awake each day around 5 or 5:15 a.m., but don’t want to get up and disturb the household until the sky starts to lighten in the east.  By sundown and full on dark, I am ready to snuggle in for the night, trying to stay up and awake with night owl hubby at least until 10 or 10:30 p.m., often to fall asleep in my chair before drifting off to bed.

The month has been a whirlwind with 5 craft markets in 5 weeks that require loading and unloading the set up and product from the car.

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This Saturday is the last one for the year with no more until spring.

The month also has included 3 Christmas celebrations, two in costume at Wilderness Road Regional Museum for their music, Christmas treats, and evening lighted tours as I spun on a beautiful old Walking Wheel that with a tiny bit of TLC by me, now works.

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I love this photo with the shadow of the wheel on the wall.  This one is credited to April the organizer of the events.  There will be one more on Old Christmas that I will also attend in costume.  The third celebration was with the spinning group to which I belong.  I have not been a very good participant of late with everything else going on, but made a point of joining them for that as many folks that don’t get to come regularly come for this event and I enjoy seeing my friends.  I hope to get back to the weekly spin days after the holidays.

The month provided another challenge as I bought a dozen winter chicks about 4 1/2 weeks ago.  They were fortunately already 2 weeks old and beginning to feather out.  The “brooder” I use is a huge 110 gallon flexible plastic stock tank with a heat table for warmth.  Not a fan of having the birds in the house, the stock tank is in the garage on a carpet covered platform about 4 inches off the ground.  It was cold when we brought them home and ended up adding a 250W red heat lamp and covering half of the top with a mylar sheet to help retain the heat.  This was functioning okay until we were threatened with and received more than a foot of snow.  Wet snow this time of year often results in loss of power, so the brooder was dragged around the back of the house and into the walk out finished basement where there is a wood stove, before the snow began.  The stove was kept going until we were sure the power was not going out, about 3 days.

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The snow was beautiful and before it was totally gone, the brooder was loaded onto a sled and dragged back to the garage.  By Monday, the littles were 6 weeks old, fully feathered and too big for the stock tank, so the thoroughly cleaned coop was layered with about a foot of straw and they were moved to tough it out without the benefit of supplemental heat.  We have had several very cold nights and all is well in the coop.  The basement then received a deep cleaning to remove the dust from having the chicks indoors for a week.

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I am working on teaching them to use the adult no waste feeder and no waste waterer, while providing the hanging feeder as well.  They are beginning to get their adult colorations.  By mid week next week they should know that food and water are in the coop and that is where to return when hungry and at night and they will be let out into the run.  I fear they are still small enough to get through the holes in the fence though and I don’t like to panic them by trying to catch them but until they will follow me back to the run for treats, they can’t free range.

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This view if you have followed the blog for long, often appears.  The end of that ridge in the distance drops to a gap to the New River.  That view is one of my favorites from the farm and it was just over 13 years ago that we saw this property for the first time in early December.  By January, it was ours to plan and build on.  If you can love a property in the bleak of winter, you can really love it anytime.

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The deck progressed in the past month as well, with a Thanksgiving weekend being spent by son and daughter in law preparing it for the decking, rails, and balusters.  Those materials are to be delivered tomorrow and by the first of the year, hopefully, we will be able to safely step out of the French doors of the dining room onto a solid surface, not a one story drop.  It is deceptive as the stairs come down on a flat created and held in place by a gorgeous stone retaining wall.  The deck itself is one story up from the grade below.

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With the prep for Christmas, the various events, cooking for family for Thanksgiving and preparing to cook for Christmas, little knitting or spinning have been done except for two pair of wool socks for a tiny farmer, the toddler son of one of the regular vendors at the market.  They have been knit this week after she asked last Saturday.  I hope they fit the little guy and can be passed down to his baby brother in another couple of years.

I hope you have a very Merry Christmas or other seasonal holiday of this time of year and a Happy New Year.

Wind down, wind up – 11/24/2018

The first craft show is done.  It wasn’t a bust, but not a great success either.  There were many vendors with holiday decorations made with artificial flowers and purchased craft store doodads, a few nice country furniture makers, and too many vendors of body products.  My spot, though on an inside aisle corner was toward the end of the path though, so many other soap makers had already tempted the buyers.  My hand spun, hand knit wearables were out of the price market for most of the buyers.  It was an experiment and probably won’t be repeated.

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Additional hats and mitts are being knit to further supply the upcoming three weekend holiday markets.

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Two new 3 step displays have been purchased for the soaps, lotion bars, and salves.  They need to be stained and poly finished before next weekend.

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Their footprint is about the same as the crates, but raises the product to a more visible position.  As most of my soaps are vegan, I have purchased some organic soy wax and will make vegan lotion bars and salves as well and will have a vegan display and a soy free display.  They will be raised above the table height enough that men’s grooming boxes and beard/body oils can be displayed below.

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Each of my children were given a crewel work Christmas stocking that I made when they were infants and which they still use.  Each grandchild has been given one, either quilted or knitted intarsia.  Our 7th grandchild was born this past summer and she will get her stocking this year.  It still needs to be lined and some add on ornamentation sewn on and each stocking has a tag sewn inside that is a cross stitched message that says “Made with love, Mom or Grandmom, year” that needs to be stitched and added.

The afternoon of the craft show, our eldest son arrived on a bus to continue working on rebuilding our deck and reinstalling the Direct TV dish.  Toward the end of summer, he and his wife set in concrete, a metal post off the corner of the house for it to be mounted on, but it needed to set.  In the meantime, they had a medical emergency now ok which delayed further work, but he came to get more done.  His wife and son came Wednesday after work to celebrate Thanksgiving.

On one of our excursions out to get supplies for the deck and dish, we went to Rural King and they had chicks.  We came home with the lumber and hardware, set up the big rubber brooder tub and heat table with plans to go back the next day to get the chicks.  Instead, we had to go back out that afternoon as we realized that something had been left at one of the shops, so bedding, feed, and a new water base were purchased and a dozen two week old chicks were brought home for spring laying.

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The Buff Orpington and Welsummers that are almost two have not resumed laying since they molted and we have not gotten a single egg in a month.  Eggs had to be purchased for the family staying here and for Thanksgiving cooking.  We got 3 each Welsummers, Mottled Javas, New Hampshires, and Olive Eggers.  Being almost three weeks old now, they are feathering out and will soon try to fly out of the brooder.  A screen is over the top and the heat lamp that had to be added with the heat table because of the cold in the garage will hopefully thwart that attempt.  The hens will be moved to the cull coop as soon as the fence is fixed there and the coop will be scrubbed and sanitized so the chicks can be relocated out there when they are 6 or 7 weeks old.

Thanksgiving dinner was celebrated with two of our children and their families.  The almost 17 pound local turkey was spatchcocked by eldest son, the sides assembled and a delicious, hearty, mostly local meal was group prepared and enjoyed by all.  The left over turkey enjoyed again for lunch yesterday, and gallons of turkey broth made and frozen for cooking over the next few weeks.  Eldest son went home with some.

Today is our local granddaughter’s 7th birthday and we will be celebrating her birthday and her Mom’s tonight as her Mom will be away for hers.  That will end the November birthday’s for our family. Jim took me to my favorite local restaurant for my birthday last week and I had an awesome risotto with pumpkin, mushrooms, cranberries, and pecans.

During evening hours after a day’s work and knitting have worn me out, caused joint pain, or just stress from the day, I have turned to the calming, meditative art of Zentangle.  The two tiles below are the efforts of the past week, never spending more than about 20 minutes a day of refocus and calming.

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Experiments, successes, failures – November 13, 2018

The first craft event is creeping up quickly.  The preparation is plugging along.  Last night, the hand spun, hand knit Assymetrical Scarf was finished.  I played chicken trying to use every inch of the hand spun Merino and Bamboo and failed, resulting in having to tink back 3/4 of the width of bind off stitches and an entire purled row in order to have enough yarn to bind off successfully.  There certainly wasn’t much waste, only about 18″ of the skein remained.  It is currently spread out on a beach towel on a guest bed drying from being blocked.

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It will add one more scarf to the inventory for the upcoming events.  The other one I am working on is a 5″ wide rectangle and have decided once it is 20″ long, bind off, stitch up the ends and pick up stitches along the edge, knitting upward to make a hat.  I don’t really like it as a scarf and it is hand spun superwash merino, so it will make a good reversible hat to add to the inventory.

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Other experiments have been in the soaping.  The use of cosmetic clays has been part of the chemistry as natural colorants of the soap and as the clays have very beneficial properties, but the clays have always been blended in thoroughly, giving the soap an even color.  A few days ago, I decided to play around and divided the batch in half, mixing the clay with half and dark cocoa with the other half.  Cocoa is a good antioxidant and a natural colorant.  The clay layer was poured into the mold, the cocoa layer on top and lightly swirled with a plastic spatula.  I am very pleased with the resulting product that is curing for the December events. The green tea with European clay is a success and a nice green color.  It was fairly highly super-fatted so it is soft and will require a long cure.

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The favored Goat milk, oatmeal, and honey soap did not fare so well, there is a very soft tunnel through the top quarter that even if it firms up will leave a miscolored, misshapen bar.  That one fails about a third of the time.  The resulting product are bars that get used here at home.  It is most successful if I let the sodium hydroxide solution and the oil mixture cool to room temperature before mixing and by adding the goat milk, honey, and oatmeal before adding the solution.  It takes forever to get to trace, a thick pudding like consistency, necessary before pouring it into the molds.  So that one was a failure.

The 4th batch is saponifying now.  It is a Himalayan Pink Salt and Moroccan Red Clay scented with Lavender.  It will be interesting tomorrow to see how red it turns.  The poured color is never true.

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Kitchen Chemistry – Nov. 11, 2018

The day dawned very, very cold for this time of year.  According to our local weather blogger, the last time it was this cold this early was 1995 and a couple of weeks later they had a record snowfall.  I hope we aren’t headed for a repeat of that.

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More work has been put into the Asymmetrical Scarf of hand spun Merino and bamboo, the ball of yarn is getting thinner and the scarf is getting longer.  Hopefully it will be done by Saturday for the first craft show.

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I love the colors and realized that it blends with the project bag that is containing it.

The afternoon was spent with more kitchen chemistry.  The lotion bars that were molded yesterday weren’t firm enough and there was no more beeswax in the house.  A quick trip out to resupply it and get two essential oils.  Since the metal measure that was the top of the double boiler had another batch to be poured, beeswax was added to it and remelted, the soft bars that I froze overnight so they could be removed from the silicon molds were dumped on a labelled sheet so I wouldn’t mix the scents, the molds washed and refilled with a Man bar scent and some unscented ones and while they were setting up, one of the scents from yesterday was remelted and more wax added.  This process was repeated until all had been remade with a more solid mixture.

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While they were setting up, one of yesterday’s soap molds was sliced into bars to cure.  The other mold wasn’t quite ready yet.  A third batch was measured out and made, Moroccan Red Clay and Cocoa soap.  I am anxious to see how this one unmolds as it was divided in half.  One half getting the red clay, the other half getting the dark cocoa, they were then poured in two layers and swirled.  This was a new technique for me.

Once the soap was wrapped in a towel to set up overnight, the lotion bars were tinned up, labelled, and sealed with shrink bands.

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The big crate has 8 sections and seven of them have different scents of lotion bars leaving a jumble of salves in the front and a need for a way to display them.  There was a smaller deeper box that looked promising if altered.  The top part was sawed off and the slats broken apart, the two long ones cut to the length of the two shorter ones and the parts painted with the Melted Chocolate color paint that has been used on the other crates and frames.

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It is about half the size and once all the parts are dry, the slats will be glued in to provide spacers for the smaller tins of salves.  A bit of table arranging will be necessary to make it all fit, but it will work.

The kitchen chemistry for the day ended with the magic of making pizza dough and a homemade pizza with the fresh mozzarella purchased at the Farmers Market yesterday.  A jar of the pizza sauce I canned, a Farmers Market red onion and Italian Sausage, some mushrooms, and pepperoni from the grocer and again we enjoyed great pizza.  The chickens will enjoy the crust bits and the whey from the cheese tomorrow.

Back to knitting while the paint dried.

Craft season – Nov. 10, 2018

Craft season is upon us.  Today we wandered about the big show that may be in my future next year to see who had what, prices, and may have bought gifts for upcoming birthdays and Christmas.  One of my products is soap and there were at least three vendors with soap.  One had felted soap for $12/bar, one had beautifully packaged bars that you couldn’t see or smell for $4.50 each.  Another had melt and pour bars in gaudy colors and scents for $6 each.  Knitwear was scarce.  If my friend and I share a booth, we would have enough inventory of items to make a go of it, I think.

This upcoming weekend is my first show of the season, followed by the first three Saturdays in December at the Holiday Markets held by the Blacksburg Farmers’ Market.  Those are always fun, often cold and windy, but among friends.  Thermos of hot coffee or tea or soup and Hot Hands packets to go in gloves are in order.  I hope my shop apron fits over my parka.

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With it’s big pockets, it is good for cash, a pen, and the Square reader on my phone.

Once the notification came in today that those were a go, more soap needed to be made.

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Two batches were made this afternoon, the Goatmilk, Oatmeal, Honey soap which is my favorite, but has about a 33% fail rate, and a Green Tea European Clay batch.  Those need to sit wrapped in a towel tonight and labels need to be made so I don’t forget what went into them.  Tomorrow I will make a Moroccan Red Clay and Cocoa batch, and a Lavender batch.  Once the soaps are curing more lotion bars need to be molded and labelled.  The weather will be cool enough that I won’t have the melt problem I had last spring.

In order to have my sales come out even dollar amounts after collecting state sales tax, I have played with numbers to figure out how much to charge.

I have another half pound of alpaca/merino to spin and a two scarves to finish knitting.  Guess I had better get busy.