Tag Archives: garden

Recovery Day

It seems that after a day of toil in the garden, this senior citizen needs a rest day.  Yesterday was basically a nice day, mostly cloudy, but warm, but the body said no more.

The spring cover crop seed has arrived and it needs to be planted, but the area in which it is to go must be cultivated, sown, then raked. We don’t own a tiller, nor can either of us manhandle more than a small one at this point and the only other option is to take the 3 prong cultivator and do it by hand.  It is a large area and the tractor drove back and forth over it while clearing it and moving soil for the boxes, so it is fairly compacted.  Instead of tackling it yesterday, I opted to stay in and craft.  There is a good supply of Leister Longwool fiber from Sunrise Valley Farm locally and a plan still in place to spin enough to make me a sweater from it.  The first attempt was just too heavy trying to do Fair Isle with yarn that was at least light worsted weight.  One bobbin was full of a very fine singles and another was started.  By last night, the second bobbin had been spun and the two plyed into 405.33 yards if fingering to sport weight yarn.  If knit on slightly larger needles than that weight would normally call for, I think it will be a nice draping fabric for a sweater. There is a lot more of the fiber to go and more from this year’s shearing reserved for me.  More must be spun, about 3 or more skeins that size, a pattern selected, and a decision about whether to add color, keep it natural, or dye the completed sweater.

Yarn

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In the midst of the spinning, grand daughter announced that she was old enough to learn to knit and wanted to learn to spin.  The first knitting lesson was given with her sitting between my legs and me doing the wrap while she held both ends of the circular needle, picked up the next stitch, criss-crossed the ends in the right position, let me wrap, then over the top and off the needle.  She did a row and a half before her brother came home and she wanted to go outside and play.  She is in no way ready to knit on her own, but she is eager and understands what she has to do.

Also breaking up the spinning on the Louët, making the yarn for the sweater, continued practice occurs on the great wheel.  There are still a couple of issues that a solution evades me.  The post that holds the wheel if fully set causes the wheel to drag at one point.  If it is shimmed enough to allow the clearance, it tends to pivot slightly causing the drive band to walk off.  This requires fairly constant readjustment to prevent the drive band from falling.  The mother of all that holds the quill is slightly loose in it’s mounting and even the light tension required to draft the fiber causes it to pivot slightly which can also cause the drive band to walk off.  Both of these problems need to be solved, though the process of long draw spinning and winding onto the quill is getting more consistent.

Last night the wind howled and at first light when taking grandson to the bus stop, it revealed that both row cover domes had blown off the beds.  Once both kids were dispatched to bus and preschool, a bit of repair work was done, hopefully to stay in place during today’s continued cold wind.  Tonight is supposed to drop to 24ºf (-4.44c) and though there are no sprouts yet, the beds need protection.

The plum trees still need to be planted.  Maybe after lunch.

Olio-March 10, 2017

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things.

March came in like a lion and the lion is roaring.  The wind is howling, the temperature has fallen 15 degrees since 6:45 a.m. and will fall into the teens tonight, for a total of more than 35ºf.  We have a very cold weekend and week ahead with 5 to 8 inches of snow predicted for Monday.

We were supposed to go to Waynesboro to pick up 16 young chicks on Monday.  Fortunately, they called today and said the chicks have all arrived and are healthy and can be picked up tomorrow instead.  Making a 2 + hour drive each way in snow is not appealing, plus it could result in a school closure or at least early release which would be difficult to deal with if we are on the road. Instead, we will do our usual Saturday morning breakfast out, Farmers Market run, and take off to get the babies.  Because it is to be so cold, the chicks will have to be in the house somewhere instead of the brooder box in the garage.  Keeping them indoors requires a secure enough box that daughter’s cats and all of the dogs can’t get to them.  It also means that the grands need a daily reminder that they are babies and are not to be handled at will.  Chicks and chickens are dirty and I don’t like brooding them in the house, but with nights in the teens, the garage will just be too cold even with the Brinsea mother table in their box.

A couple of weeks ago, my laptop began to sound like a rocket about to take off each time it was opened for use, and the battery hasn’t held a charge for months.  With a can of compressed air, the fan was cleaned out and with the help of Amazon, a factory battery was purchased.  For about 24 hours, it seemed like everything was going to be good, then day before yesterday, when it was opened to use it, it was kaput.  It wouldn’t turn on, black screen, no sounds.  Hoping that perhaps the new battery was faulty, the old one was reinstalled, and everything plugged in, but no go.  The 4 year old laptop was not going to come on.  The techie guy says that HPs that were originally loaded with Windows 7 or 8 and upgraded to 10 seemed to be dying at phenomenal rates.  The motherboard is dead, same thing happened to daughter’s right before Christmas.  That left me without a computer and my tablet doesn’t like the blog or my square up shop.  That sent us out to find a reasonably priced replacement.  We got me an Acer Spin 1.  It has a touchscreen, can be used as a tablet or laptop, and best of all was inexpensive.  It may not last forever, but the laptops seem to have a 2-4 year lifespan.  I had some folks recommend Mac books, but I had a very bad experience with an apple phone and just couldn’t go that route.  It is small enough to travel with, has a full sized keyboard, so I am set.  It seems that laptops come with a one month trial of Microsoft Office, but unlike the past, when you bought the program, it was good for the life of the computer, now it is an annual subscription.  What a racket!

The garden box purchased earlier this week was set yesterday.  The larger sized one came with 6 extra boards so that it could be set up three boards high, but 2 is high enough.  If one more 4 x 4 box is purchased, with the extra boards, it can be made as a 4 x 8 box using the extra boards.  It is too cold to plant even the onion sets for the next week, so garden will just have to wait.  It is almost time to start the pepper seed in the house.  In a couple more weeks, the tomatoes as well.  We aim for the second week of May for putting the plants in the ground.  Another month we can plant the peas.  The anticipation makes the wait hard, but we are always rewarded with the garden goodies later.

Maybe, the header will represent Monday, but we hope not. Five of the past 8 years, there has been measurable snow in March.

 

 

Busy Day

After a couple of days of winter, staying inside and knitting a hat for the shop, today is almost spring and it is sunny.

After breakfast, the pile of compost in the garden that was pushed aside for the boxes was attacked with a shovel.  Hard work for an already sore back, but it needed doing.  A lunch break and trip to town to get some more seeds for our garden and for son’s garden and back to work, this time with the tractor.  After moving some of the loose spoiled hay, flipping the bale, moving one of the half barrels, the tractor barely fit between the box and fence.  Using the bucket on the tractor, the three boxes were filled, some hand leveling with the rake and shovel and they are all ready to plant.  The tractor was then used to remove wood and rocks from the lower part that was ignored last  year, then the bucket was used to smooth and level that part.

garden

 

Son let me know yesterday that his family was going to have a large garden this year too, so fewer tomatoes and hot peppers need to be planted here, making room for some produce that otherwise wasn’t going in this year’s garden.  By clearing the lower garden that still needs a light tilling, a larger corn patch can be planted.  Two more 4 X 8′ boxes still need to be purchased and put in place, but soil for one of them was piled up where it should go.

Tomorrow the onion sets will be planted and covered,  one of the larger boxes and a starter flat purchased.  Some fence adjustment is going to be made to allow for a gate, maybe one large enough to allow the tractor in the lower part of the garden.  Next Monday, we go pick up the dozen chicks.  Spring is coming, grass is greening, buds swelling.  Soon we will have broody hens and more chicks.

Plan at work

With daughter’s family away this week to let grandson be with his father’s family for a few days before his service tomorrow, there have been no morning duties other than to the animals.  The morning person, me, usually awakes as the sky is dawning, but there have been several nights this week where sleep came quickly for about an hour, then wide awake for 3 or 4, then sleep again for a couple.  The pups haven’t been too demanding, and napping or just lying about until near 8 a.m. has been the norm this week.  This morning, when the dogs were let out and the outdoor kitty fed, it was already warm enough for just a t shirt.  As soon as all the critters had been fed and given outdoor time, the garden called.  The boxes we bought two days ago needed to be assembled and put in place.  The first one required undoing one end of an existing box to make it a double.  The raspberries were thinned and heavily mulched with spoiled hay to try to reduce the weed load.  They may be dug up and planted in half sunk pots to contain them, but the rest of the work needs to be done first.

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The description of the plan seemed confusing, so last night the online garden planner was pulled back up, the plan deleted and a new one begun.  As this is oriented, the chicken coop is just off the upper left corner.

plan at work

This was taken just about where the garden gate is, off the row of 4 boxes in the diagram.

The top edge was done and one more box assembled, hay moved around, raspberries mulched and a break taken to go to town.  Groceries needed to be purchased, a new garden fork was also in order.  Mine had a fiberglass handle that split lengthwise two summers ago.  It still works okay for cleaning out the coop, but lacks the strength to do garden work.  It was taken in last year to see if the Feed and Seed guys could put a new handle on it, but sadly not.  Wrapping it with fiberglass tape might give it some more life, but probably still not garden worthy.  Last year, eldest son’s was used, but now that they are in a house, not an apartment, it moved to his house.  At the Feed and Seed store, they had a garden cart too.  Plans had been in the works for one of those.  We have two over-sized single wheel wheelbarrows, but they always tip over when I use them, plus they are very heavy.  Both of them are stored now in the barn until one can be taken to eldest son.  We came home with a cart and a fork.

cart  Fork

 

Each time a gardening session is in order, many trips must be made back and forth to the garage to get all the tools needed for the day’s jobs.  Then many trips to return it all.  This little two wheeled cart is light enough for me to easily use, big enough to load everything into in one trip each way, and will come in handy for hauling bales of straw or bags of mulch.  To make room for it in the garage, first a major cleanup was done in there.  Jim had gone off to enjoy the springlike day on the BBH (his motorcycle).  Once the garage was done, the tractor was brought down to the garden.  Nothing on this farm is flat so the tractor bucket was used to terrace for the new boxes.  That part of the garden is deep in rich compost and pushing it off to flatten areas will give me great soil to fill the boxes.  The remaining boxes we recently purchased were assembled in place, unprinted cardboard laid down between the boxes and covered with spoiled hay to make good aisles and two of the new boxes were filled.

That was all this body could handle in one day.  There is rain expected tomorrow morning, then clearing off, but cooler, perhaps the other two boxes can be filled and more aisles laid and mulched.  The plan still needs 4 more of the boxes, but they are for tomatoes and sweet potatoes, so I have at least 2 months before safe planting time for them.  In the meantime, the newly acquired essential tool will be used to continue to remove weeds from below where the tractor moved the soil and the onion sets will be planted, seeds will be sown indoors in about 3 weeks for the tomatoes, peppers, and tomatillos.  The plan is in progress.

Boxes

The garden box per month purchase idea got sidelined this winter somehow. Today some catch up was in order. Home Depot had 4 complete boxes of the 4×4′ ones and several 4×8′ ones that though they were made of the same parts minus 4 slats as two of the smaller ones, cost more than twice as much. The price was higher than the 2 purchased in the fall. We came home with the 4 and with what is in the garden already will allow me to combine sets and end up with an extra 4×4 once corner posts of some sort are found.

Tomorrow the rain will be gone and an attempt to put the new ones in place with more paths mulched will occur. It is almost onion set and pea seed planting time. Home Depot already had cabbage, lettuce, and broccoli starts.

Tractor supply got some chicks in today. We live halfway between two stores so both were called. One only had meat chicks, the other got Welsummers and Americaunas.  Oh the temptation to add some Welsummers with their dark reddish brown eggs, but saner heads prevailed. New Country Organics, 2 hours from us will be getting several heritage breeds of chicks in early March but you had to reserve them. A dozen straight run Buff Orpington chicks were reserved today and a day trip in a few weeks is in order with a tub to haul them home.  That store has been on my agenda for a while so this will be an opportunity to visit and get some garden supplements in time to make the seed starter mix.

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The cowl out of my handspun silk is dry, soft, and beautiful. Because I don’t care for tight things around my neck, I added one pattern repeat. Lovely pattern, Pretty Thing by Stephanie Pearl McFee aka The Yarn Harlot.

 

A Day Outdoors

It isn’t really here and cold will come again, but yesterday was spring time.  The tractor finally got warm enough to start, allowing  some chores that had been needed for a while.  Haying farmer friend always brings me a couple of bales of old spoiled hay after he takes the new hay each year.  That old hay is used in the chicken coop until it gets too wet to be usable, it also is used over cardboard as mulch between the beds in the garden to help keep the weeds at bay.  One of the bales was dropped where it could be rolled down near the coop, but the second one was too far from the garden.  Our little tractor is too small to load a large round bale and though that ball wasn’t a full bale, it was too large for the bucket, so it just sat.  Now that the boxes are being put in place in the garden and mulching between them is necessary, the bale needed to be moved.  pushing it with the tractor bucket started it to unroll.  Once it was about half of it’s original size, it fit inside the bucket and was dumped over the fence into the garden.  Then the unrolled parts were collected with a hay fork, loaded into the bucket in several trips and dumped over the fence as well.

 

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Now there is a huge pile of spoiled hay just inside the movable part of the fence that serves as a gate.  Maybe this spring, a real gate will be hung. Shortly after moving in, we bought 4 half wine barrels at a winery to use for storing root vegetables.  They were only used for a year or so that way and then two of them were put in the garden for flowers and later for potatoes.  The remaining two were left behind the house and had begun to come apart.  One of them was sound enough to move very carefully yesterday in the tractor bucket and carried into the garden, partially filled with soil to help hold it together.  There are now three in the garden for potatoes.  The fourth one fell all to pieces and needs to be puzzled back together.  It really should be in the garden too.  For now it is a pile of staves, metal rings, and a bottom.

While the tractor was out, the culvert at the top of the driveway received a clean out as the winter rain has caused it to nearly fill with fine gravel again.  Two buckets of gravel, sand, and soil were scooped out and utilized to build up the area in front of the garage door that was forming a pond with each rain.

driveway

It was pretty quick work to scoop a bucket full from the ditch, drive it down, dump it and use the bucket to spread it flatter.  It only took a few more minutes with a rake to make a gravel area again where it was only sandy mud.  We will see when it rains again if the pond is gone and the water runs around the house as intended.

Some flower bed weeding was accomplished, the chickens loving something fresh and green to eat, the peach tree pruning was begun, but just too much to tackle in one attack.  It won’t produce fruit this year, but will be a much more manageable size for pruning in future years and perhaps the other peach tree will give us some fruit this year.

It was nice to be outdoors in February working in the yard and gardens.  Last year, we had just been plowed out by our farmer friend from one of the largest snows of the winter.

We are still searching for some chickens to increase our flock.  Chick days are about to begin, but that is really not the preferred approach.  Hopefully, the hens will be prolific this year and there will be many homegrown chicks from which to choose.  Their fencing still needs to be removed and replaced with a finer mesh and a top put in place to try to thwart the hawk so that we don’t lose so many this year.

We are toying with adding two piglets, putting them in the lower garden which is a large space.  To do so, perhaps that fencing will be used for the replacement fencing, it is good welded wire fence and just run a row of chicken wire around the bottom of the chicks pen.  We could just use strands of electric to keep the piglets in or put hog panels between the t-posts. More research needs to be done before that step is taken, to see how much a port-a-hut costs, how much feed will be needed, and where and how to get them processed.  It needs to be economical in the long run.

That would be another nice step toward self sustainability.  Still loving life on our farm.

 

 

Contrasts

 

 

Yesterday was thick, gray, looked like it was going to snow weather.  Threats of it doing so were made late in the afternoon, but it never materialized.  It was cold, hovering around 30ºf for a high.  Granddaughter had an after preschool play date with her “bestie,” so we ran errands.  In spite of the fact that it is mid winter here, the stores are all dressed in summer finery and all the winter goods are marked down, seriously down.  My wardrobe has a dress coat that isn’t very warm when it is really cold, a ski jacket that is short and white, an ugly pink, nasty barn coat that is warm but not to be seen in public. Just in time for it to plummet into the teens last night, we found a parka with faux fur hood, 70% off, rated to -13ºf (not that it ever gets that cold here).

parka

 

Somebody who loves me said, “sure,” so it followed us home.  When we headed out for our Saturday morning breakfast and Farmers Market venture this morning it was 18ºf, but a beautiful sunny day.  It was so cozy wearing my new parka to the market, the only  thing that got cold was the hand that had to deal with paying for the goodies that were purchased.

It has finally gotten up in the upper 30’s and will warm back up this week and then it will roller coaster back down again.  It will be nice to have this warmth when it is cold outside, those frigid mornings that require chipping ice off the windshield to take grandson to the bus stop, those hovering at freezing days when the wind is howling, or when a walk in the snowy woods is in order.

seeds

 

In contrast to the cold, today the post brought the summer seed.  The vegetables, flowers, and cover crop bounty.  Some onion sets, potato starts, some brassicas and chard seedlings will be bought locally, not started in the basement or the utility room window sill. The garden plan is done.  There are still two wooden half barrels that need repair and relocation to the garden to be filled.  The potatoes will be grown in the barrels. The fencing needs some work, some clean up is necessary in the lower part of the garden that will be sown in oats and flowers this year except for the blueberry bed.  The overgrown peach tree still needs the major pruning.  Perhaps this week when the weather is mild and dry.

lazydog

 

Lets end this post with 200 pounds of silly dog who was in the sun, but it moved and he didn’t.  Note the discrete use of the tail.

Graupel and wind

Winter arrived again yesterday.  We had been experiencing unseasonably warm temperatures, lots of rain, and I feared for the garlic and asparagus mulched over in the garden.  The garlic has sprouted some, but I know from experience that it will be okay.  Some cloves might be a bit smaller, but it will still form.  The asparagus, I am really worried about.  This will be year 3.  The year I can actually expect to harvest some of the delightful spears, but the crowns won’t survive if they sprout and then freeze.

Yesterday was sunny off and on and the temperature dropped more than 20ºf between the time I dropped grandson at his bus and sunset yesterday.  More drop occurred during the night and though it isn’t as cold as a few weeks ago, today we have mountain snow showers and high wind, serious wind chill.

The chickens came out to scratch for their grain that was tossed on the ground and all went back in the coop.  Too cold and windy for their preference.  I don’t blame them, I don’t want to be out in it either.

When I dropped granddaughter off at preschool, I stopped and bought more grain to make chicken food, I was nearly out. It was cold in the garage while I worked on that and as I added more straw to their coop to help keep them warm.

Later, we picked granddaughter up from preschool, bought a bowl of soup for lunch, picked up a book I had reserved at the library, mailed a box of yarn to a charity and came home.  Cuddled in my chair with knitting, a book, and watching it snow, I knew that I would have to go out again in a few minutes to pick grandson up from school.  Back home from that, I don’t plan to venture out again.  A cup of tea, my stress free chair, maybe a blanket and I will stay put until time to cook dinner.  Even though I don’t want to go outside again,  the chickens will need some scratch, their pop door closed, and whatever number of eggs they laid today collected.  I guess that means yet another venture into the cold.

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The next couple of days are expected to be even colder.  Maybe the wind will at least die down.

shoots

The iris and jonquils think it is spring.

Olio-December 2, 2016

Olio: a miscellaneous collection of things.

The winter is setting in.  After much very dry weather with burn bans and hardly a sprinkle, we had two days of fairly continuous rain, much needed, but none the less uncomfortable to have to be out in taking grands to their bus stops or preschools, running errands, etc.  It wasn’t a warm spring type rain, it was cold, blustery, and wet.  It is the rain that helped the Amherst County and Tennessee fire fighting effort.  Living in a rural area with tree covered mountains around us, we fear fire when it is dry.  In 1902, the community that provides our zip code was virtually destroyed by a sweeping wildfire that consumed all but a small handful of now historic buildings and homes.

The rain helped relieve some of the tension that the very dry period had caused, though the heavy downpours gouged out gullies in our unpaved state road again and swept the leaves that had filled the ditches into mounds in the road and along the sides of the narrow road.  After the first day of heavy rain, I stopped and hand cleared the leaves from the ditch just above the culvert that runs under our driveway so that the rain could flow freely through and down to the run off creek.  Our driveway is pocked with run off gouges that will fill back in as we drive it.

The chickens never have started laying again since their molt, so I am getting 1 green egg from the Americauna that didn’t molt about every couple of days.  The Buff Orpingtons will generally lay some during the cold weather, but they have not resumed. They enjoy the sunshine when it is out and forage through the lower garden that is theirs for the winter at least.

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Every time I have planned to plant garlic in the past few weeks, I have been distracted from the task by other chores or the weather.  This morning, I got my bi monthly newsletter from the host of my garden planner and it indicated that it was not too late.  After picking granddaughter up from preschool, I bundled in my barn coat, muck boots, a knit hat and toughed the cold blustery day to get the job done finally.  I knew that if I did not do it now, that there would be no homegrown garlic next summer and fall.  A 4 foot square cedar box was planted with about 90 cloves of garlic to provide the heads for next year.  There were two kinds saved for planting, Redneck Riviera and German Red.  Next year, I think I will also locate and plant a soft neck variety too.

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The first box of the new garden plan is planted and mulched.  My purchase plan of two boxes a month has been put on hold until after Christmas, but there is a stack of cardboard in the garage to use as mulch base between the boxes once they are purchased.  I still have plenty of spoiled hay to use on top of the cardboard once it is in place around the boxes.  I probably should place a layer below the second box in the above picture before the weeds decide to move in.

Once back in and thawed, I resumed plying the 4 ounces of Alpaca and Merino that I have been spinning for the past couple of days.  I had about an ounce on one bobbin and needed to finish spinning and plying it so that I have the bobbins free for this weekend.  It ended up a beautiful 250 yard skein that will be so warm and cozy as a cowl or hat with the 70% alpaca content.

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I will be spinning in the historic Smithfield Plantation House during their Holiday event this weekend.  Their theme this year is based on products that they produced such as hemp, honey, and fiber.  I am taking some washed unprocessed Dorset wool and hand carders, as well as some already processed Dorset wool roving to spin during the event on Saturday and Sunday afternoons.  This is the last of the events at the site until it reopens in the spring.  I have enjoyed my afternoons volunteering there this late summer and fall.

Home again

In the past 10 days, Jim and I drove west to east across the state to meet our newest grand daughter, and I have driven from the southwest part of the state, north and slightly east to spend 5 days helping out at eldest son’s house and then home late yesterday.  The drive north on Monday was stressful as I had to drive Jim’s Xterra with a 22 foot extension ladder strapped to the roof.  The ladder or the straps holding it vibrated and rumbled loudly if my speed was greater than 40 mph and as the entire route is interstate and a 55 mph highway, except for 8 miles on our end and 8 miles on their end, I arrived stressed with a headache until I could chill out for a while.  Yesterday, I helped pick up a clothes dryer in the back of the Xterra and then began my trip home.  The trek back yesterday afternoon was quieter and a pleasant drive until late afternoon when I was headed west with the sun in my eyes.

Because of the solo time with them off at work and grandson at school all day, I got a lot of spinning done and most of the yoke of my sweater done.

aubergine

 

This is 400 of the 600 yards of sport weight yarn that was spun.  The last bit is still being plyed and wound.  The Wool was a 6+ ounce of Corriedale with Kid Mohair ball that I bought when at Roan Mountain in the fall.  When I got to Hawk’s Nest a month later, I pulled it out to spin and realized that it was slightly felted, perhaps to over dyeing and was disappointed.  I had bought 4 ounces of similar colored Merino at Hawk’s Nest and a friend suggested that I card them together which I did when I arrived home.  I was still not having much luck spinning it and set it aside.  After I got my new Louet wheel, I pulled it out again, and it spun like a dream, very smooth and even.  The Louet bobbins are so large that getting generous skeins is possible.  I had 375 yards plyed on one bobbin but decided to put it in 200+yard skeins.  The last will be finished tonight all 3 skeins washed and once dry, labelled.  I am pleased with the outcome.

Last December, when my cousin and I were in Norfolk, Virginia, alternately sitting with my failing Dad and walking the huge hospital campus while other family member’s visited, she introduced me to her Fitbit.  I decided that it might provide me with the motivation to renew a fitness routine, so I asked Jim for one for Christmas.  He purchased me one of the current models and for the past 11 months, it has been a great motivator.  In the past couple of weeks, I have noticed that the face was beginning to separate from the band and I mentioned it to my daughter in law as she also has one.  She told me to contact them and that they would send me a new one.  That day, I found their online contact form, took a photo of the damage and sent them a message.  This company, even on a Sunday, was quick to respond with a thanks for the photo and inquiry with a few questions for me.  When I responded that it had been a Christmas gift, purchased just a few days before Christmas and where I resided, they promptly responded with an acknowledgement that it would be replaced and they wanted my preferred size and color.  It turns out, my model is discontinued and the only ones they had were not the color I wanted and much too large so instead they sent me a newer model in the color and size desired and it arrived in less than a week.  This is a company that stands behind their products and were quick to correct the defect at no cost to me.  I now have a sleek new model that fits in the color of my choice.  This one does a lot more than my old one.  They deserve kuddos.

My cold continues to abate, however, I am still coughing, I guess that will continue for a week or so.

It got cold last night.  Our outdoor thermometer registered a low of 25ºf last night.  The farm was thickly coated with frost, the hardy marigolds succumbed to the cold, the two hanging geraniums on the front porch as well.  The herb pots that remained outdoors will be dumped of the remaining soil and on a warm day, washed out and turned against the house side of the deck to overwinter.  The remaining rosemary will be tucked in a sunny protected corner to see if it will survive, if not, there is a cutting rooted in the house to start a new one next year.  There is a variety that will overwinter in the ground here if protected, but I don’t think either of the varieties that I had potted will.  On one of the mild days this week, I will plant the garlic in one of the new garden boxes.  It will be mulched.  Two more boxes will be added this months and there is more cardboard to put between them and plenty of spoiled hay to mulch the aisles.  Winter is coming on.  Early darkness, spinning and knitting evenings with a cup of hot tea at hand.

Hope you had a good weekend.

Still loving life on our farm.