Lessons from Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em – 2/24/2019

I spent the last week a couple of towns over being grandmom in charge of two of the 7 grands while their Mom flew to Wisconsin for a week of training.  It gave me a fair amount of spinning and reading time during the 2 1/2 days they had school.  Monday was a holiday, Wednesday a snow day, and Thursday a late start.  The days allowed me to finish breeds 9 and 10 and begin breed 11 for the Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em challenge.

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Since this challenge started in January, I have spun from the Critical list; Gulf Coast Native, with Florida Cracker and Hog Island in my possession to still spin.  From the Threatened list; Dorset Horn, Jacob, Karakul, Leicester Longwool, Lincoln, Navajo-Churro, and Romeldale/CVM.  From the Watch list, I have Tunis from two  suppliers, as it’s texture and natural white color will be the center of my Hap that is the knitting project that some of these yarns will be finished into.  Also spun from the Recovering list is Shetland and a second 4 ounces of it was purchased as the main secondary color of the Hap.

As I have worked the various fibers, I have had to work on my spinning skills to use the best technique for each breed.  Several have required a long backward draw and lower twist reminding me to slow my treadling.  Some shorter fiber has forced me to use a short forward draw, which isn’t my preferred method due to arthritis in my right (lead) wrist.  I am left handed and have tried to learn to reverse hands, but have not been successful.  Some fibers have had a lot of neps, some of which I have not removed, making a more textured yarn than the yarn I usually spin.  Some of the yarns require that the yarn be spun heavier than I usually spin.  Over the years, my yarn has gotten to be an even, consistent yarn  rarely thicker than dk weight.

One of the fibers came as clean unprocessed wool and had to be carded to rollags, one had to be washed and awaits flicking the tips or carding.  Some have been pencil roving, a few more cloudlike.  It has been a good learning experience so far and I look forward over the next two years, obtaining and spinning the rest of the breeds.

My preference for spinning and knitting has been a medium length staple with a crisp finish, sweaters and shawls that I keep are always of these characteristics.  I don’t care to spin the very soft next to the skin breeds, though I do spin them and knit them for items for sale in my online shop.

My preference for pencil roving, thicker roving, batts, rollags, or spinning from locks is still undecided.  I guess that will be determined by the breed on hand.

And just for fun in the midst of the week, I finished spinning a 50% merino/50% silk blend that once washed will go to the fiber retreat next week with yarns for sale.  It is 126 yards of fingeringish weight yarn.  It will make a nice trim for a hat or scarf.

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What love is. -2/14/2019

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Forty one years ago tonight, we became Mr. and Mrs.  It seems impossible that it could have been that long.  It has been a good 41.  Together we raised three bright, independent children.  There have been a few houses, many pets, lots of cars, a few job changes and finally retirement together.

There have been some medical scary moments, but we have gotten through them together.  Some tight money times when I stayed home with new babies, or you starting your own practice, but we got through them together too.

Your are my rock and my best friend.  You picked this day, such a romantic choice.  I love you dearly and hope we have many more together.

Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em – 2/7/2019

I am a spinner, both drop spindle and on one of my 4 wheels that range from ancient to less than a year old.  I started spinning about a decade ago only on drop spindles and using easy to spin, clean, dyed wool and silk.  My knowledge of wool was that it came from sheep, little did I know how many different breeds of sheep there were and how different the properties of their wool varied.  Along the way, I did get introduced to Alpaca and helped with a couple of shearings, being rewarded with some of the fiber to spin.  Alpaca lacks the lanolin of sheep wool and is easier to clean and can be spun directly from the dirty locks and then washed as yarn.  But I prefer wool and have had my preference for the breeds that I spun.

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A couple of years ago, there was a new vendor at the weekly Farmer’s Market and she had yarn and roving as part of her goods.  The wool was a breed I had not spun, in fact, had never heard of and I made a new friend and learned about the breed that was on the Livestock Conservation list, Leicester Longwool.  I enjoyed spinning the wool I bought from her sheep being raised locally.  I have been to their farm, visited with their critters last spring when there were lambs bouncing around and one little beauty being bottle fed as she had been rejected by her mom.

This friend asked me this past late summer if I had any interest in participating in a project that the Livestock Conservancy was putting together that would allow using fiber from threatened sheep breeds.  This was perfect timing as there was so much contention with the anti wool ads that were being publicized. I said yes and she said she would share the information when it was getting going.  She did, the idea that you purchase a minimum of 4 ounces of wool or yarn, spin, knit, crochet, needle felt, or otherwise produce something with the wool.  When the wool is purchased, you get a sticker, and that sticker goes into a passport book that you get for registering as a fiber artist with the program.  The program is scheduled for three years and to earn a prize, you have to use at least 5 of the 22 Conservation Priority breeds.  I fell in hard and immediately ordered several wools I had never spun and finished the first 3 before I could even officially register to get my passport.

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The first three I spun were Jacob, Navajo Churro, and Shetland.  Shetland is the only one I had previously handled.  I enjoyed all three of these, really falling in love with Jacob.  As I started the fourth, Karakul, they opened the registration and I quickly sent my $15 to get the passport, a lapel pin, and more information which I am anxiously awaiting the arrival.

Last night I finished the Karakul, an ancient Asian breed that as lambs have a decent fleece, it is a primitive breed with a double coat and as they age, the coat often gets fairly coarse.  It is the wool of Persian rugs.  The Karakul 4 ounces was interesting to spin, feeling much like spinning flax or a horse’s tail, but the whole purpose of this is to experience the different breeds and to support them as they are all in need of conservation.

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Many of the fiber providers offer a breed card with information on the breed and how to spin it and some have offered small samples from a sheep of the same breed, but a different color than the one ordered.  I am using the card to hold a bit of unspun fiber, a bit of spun yarn, and either using the sample to make a mini skein or just winding off a few yards of the spun yarn to make a mini skein that I will be able to use when I do demonstrations or teach camps to show the different textures and natural colors of these Conservation Priority breeds.

My fifth breed, Romeldale CVM is currently being spun.  In my basket are Tunis, Clun Forest, Leicester Longwood (from my friend), Gulf Coast Native (which is raw and has to be washed and carded but also from a local farm), and on order is Lincoln.

My goal is to try to obtain and spin all 22 breeds within the three years.  The ones that aren’t so coarse that they must be felted or made into rugs, will be knitted into a blanket, probably a log cabin blanket for our log home.

Supporting this endeavor, the shepherds that raise these sheep, and helping to dispel the horrible inaccurate ads that shearing is wrong is such a delight.  Thank you shepherds for keeping my wheels and hands busy and helping the public see that fleece comes from a sheep, not a roll of plastic cloth.

The Hoops – 2/6/2019

When I started crafting for selling at venues, I realized that I needed to have a business name, registered for a small fee, that I had to decide whether to be sole proprietor or an LLC, and jump through the State’s hoops to get an EIN and pay state taxes. Toward the end of last year, I received a notification from our county asking me for an inventory and a list of my equipment used which they used to bill me Personal Property taxes.

As I also like to vend at a couple of out of state fiber retreats, I have to register my business with those states and pay their state sales taxes as well, thus another set of applications and more hoops.

I don’t understand why organizers of craft shows, festivals, and retreats don’t let the applicants/potential vendors know that this is a state requirement and that there really is no exception, that fines of $100/day up to $1000 are real possibilities for not doing so.  I think that many vendors operate under the misconception that if they are doing it as a hobby and selling things they make or if they make under a certain amount each year that they aren’t a business.  It would be nice if the states recognized Cottage Industries and exempted them from the red tape, but it isn’t so.

Once the hoops have been cleared, it isn’t such a big deal.

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Olio – January 26, 2019

Olio:  a miscellaneous collection of things.

This past week has been bitter and sweet.  A  Redtailed Hawk discovered my pullet pen and early in the week, killed and took one of my Mottled Javas.  The pullets are about 11 or 12 weeks old now and have some size on them, but not enough to fight off a hawk.  Because of the cold, I left them cooped up the next day and spent an afternoon building a bird net cage using the 4 foot high fence and 7 foot poles, rope, and zip ties to secure it.  Last night when I went out to close up the coop for the night, the hawk was inside the net and a second Java was dead.  In the hawk’s panic to escape me, it flew through the net and out, leaving the pullet.  I considered going out today and getting a 10′ by 10′ dog run that is 6′ high that I could put a tarp or wire top on, but they are hard to come by this time of year and weigh almost 300 lbs.  A friend with a stock trailer and truck offered to help bring it here if I could find one.  Instead, some of the unused garden fencing was cut to 8′ long panels and secured across the top of the existing fence with a garden pole in the middle to help support it.  The panels were overlapped by about 8 inches and zipped tied together every foot.  When the last panel nearest the coop was ready to secure, it was tied to the previous panel then folded up to give me enough room to get to the pop door.  An arch of fencing was stapled to the side of the coop and the front of the coop and secured to the fence on the side and the last panel.  That gives me room to get in and around the coop, but will require crawling under the low part if necessary.  My hands and feet are frozen, but hopefully, the littles are safe from the hawk now.

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It isn’t pretty, but hopefully it will keep them safe.

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They were glad to be released to the sun.  Maybe this spring, a proper, secure run can be built.

The sweet side of the week involves crafting.  There is a project called Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em to support the conservation of threatened breeds of sheep.  Fiber raisers and fiber artists are encouraged to participate.  This week, I have ordered and received 4 packages of roving from different breeders, 4 ounces each of Jacob, Navajo Churro, Shetland, and Romeldale CVM, and arranged to get 4 ounces of Leicester Longwool from a breeder friend who is participating.

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Two of the breeders have provided extras, like samples of other sheep or a pen with their farm info on it.

Fiber has to be spun, photographed and submitted, yarn must be knitted, crocheted, or needle felted, photographed and submitted. It is a three year project and once you have 5 breeds done, you can submit for a prize.  After I finish spinning mine, I plan to knit a log cabin blanket with my 15 breeds.

Though I started collecting my breeds, I had some other spinning projects to finish before I could begin.  I had a 2 ounce braid I was spinning on drop spindles that I wanted to finish.  It was plyed and produced 166 yards of fingering weight yarn that is a very soft wool and silk.  There was some Alpaca and Merino that needed to be finished and I got it done as well.

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The week was also used to dye some fiber for sale in my shop.

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And finally beginning to spin one of conservation breeds, starting with the Jacob.

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The past week has been very cold and the forecast is for potential record breaking cold this week and possibly another light snow.  I need day that is mild and dry to finish trimming some of the fence edges.

Winter is not the time to take care of the outdoor tasks, but  they need to be done.  I’d rather be indoors, cooking and baking bread like I got to do yesterday before realizing that my pullet run was not as secure as I had hoped.  Tomorrow, I am fixing dinner for family and will make more bread for them to enjoy with dinner and take home for the week.

Fiber Fun – Jan. 17, 2019

The past few days have been stay in and play with fluff days.  With one of the fiber retreats coming up in late February, I decided to dye some of the Merino that I acquired last summer after jointly sending two fleeces off  for processing.  Using my soap pots and food safe dye, I dyed three 4 oz braids.  Today they were dry and labelled.

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With them is a 205 yard skein of  Merino/Alpaca yarn that I spun that will go with 2 other 200+ yard skeins.  There are 3 more braids of Merino and one of Cormo to dye.  All of these will be for sale at the retreat.

Yesterday, two of my wheels, a bag and basket of fiber, tools, and drop spindles made by me were hauled over to Wilderness Road Regional Museum.  The museum is closed in the winter except for appointments, but three of the volunteers had been asking for spinning lessons and I went to provide some instruction.  They were each given a length of roving and a drop spindle and started on some basic drafting and spinning techniques after some wool sampling. They were then given the opportunity to work with one of the wheels, the walking wheel that I repaired there and my wheels.

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It was a fun time, spreading the knowledge.  After the lesson, another of the great wheels in the museum was repaired by me, so now two of the wheels there are functional.  A spindle has been ordered by me to repair the third walking wheel displayed there.  Having three functional great wheels there will mean I don’t have to haul mine over there for events.

Today, the ice from last weekend’s storm had mostly melted away, except for sheltered and shaded areas, like right in front of our garage, so we left to run errands and get groceries.  While we were out it started to snow again and the predicted trace was rapidly accumulating.

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We got home to this around 2:30 p.m. and by dark there were several inches on the ground and wintery mix to top it overnight.  We may awake tomorrow to a repeat of the weekend.  Sunday is supposed to start in the low 40’s and fall all day to 7ºf with a very cold Monday.

Recently, I signed up for a three year program called Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em, a project to promote threatened, endangered breeds of sheep.  Shepherds that raise those breeds join and sell fleece, processed fiber, or yarn and fiber artists spin, knit, crochet, felt, weave at least 4 ounces of as many of the breeds as they can obtain. I ordered 4 ounces of Jacob roving, a threatened breed from Hobbyknob Farm.  It arrived today and I spun the 1 ounce tri color part of it this evening.

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There is a 3 ounce bump of gray roving to spin.  The Tri color spun to 64 yards of delightful fingering weight yarn.  Once the gray is spun, both will be knit into Fingerless mitts and a hat.

Today, I ordered 4 ounces of Romeldale CVM, another threatened breed from Marushka Farm.  It is fun to explore spinning and knitting some breeds that I have not previously used and supporting the continuation of these breeds.

Tomorrow, if the weather conditions and roads permit, we will drive back to Wytheville and I will put leathers and a drive band on the Great Wheel at the Edith Bolling Wilson Museum and try to get it functional.

Week on the Farm – 1/13/2019

With winter, not much goes on outdoors here on the farm.  The pullets have a usual routine of venturing out into the pen each day and back at night, they still won’t come when I shake the treat cup, so they can’t free range yet.  They have to be able to follow me back to the pen when the dogs are out.   There have been five days in the past couple of weeks where they remained cooped due to the very cold temperatures and for the past three days due to the winter storm and its coating of ice that has us encased.  We were in a winter storm watch awaiting several inches of snow.  It began as snow Saturday, getting a few inches then turned to a messy wintry mix overnight that melted most of the snow and left us with about a half inch of ice.

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With the cold hanging on, the ice is still here.  An attempt to check on the chicks on Sunday was a hazardous walk.  Monday, I chipped the ice off the car and carefully made my way to the cleared paved roads to get to daughter’s house so she could go to work and I stayed with the “snow vacationing” kids.  I left at dawn and returned near dark, so the chicks were left alone in the coop.  This morning it was time to go deal with them, though it was a very cold mid 20’s.  First order of business was to break up some of the spoiled hay bale outside their fence and get enough of it on the ice for them to venture out.  Ice chipped off their ramp so they didn’t slide out into the cold.

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They are busy exploring what seed or bugs they can find in the rotting hay while I tackled the inside of the coop to undo several days of confinement.  Their food was low, the water dispenser nearly empty, and the straw a fouled matted mess.  It is too cold to do a complete coop clean, but the old straw was forked out, new straw piled in, feed filled, and the water dispenser brought to the utility sink for a scrub down and refilling with warm water.  If it gets above freezing, I will go out and fill the black tub seen in the above photo with warm water also.  They went straight to it when I let them out, but I had dumped the ice disc out of it and not refilled it.

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They have clean dry quarters and a few warmer days ahead.

We did drive to the Edith Bolling Wilson Museum in Wytheville on Friday to see the exhibit and the living quarters that they plan on restoring, and to look at a great wheel that I am trying to restore as she kept sheep on the White House Lawn during the war and the museum promotes sheep and wool in the display.

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It is an intact, including spindle, old wheel that doesn’t line up quite right.  I have reached out to restoration experts and to an Antique wheel group to try to resolve that situation.  Later this week, I will return to put leathers and a drive band on it and see if I can make it spin wool.  Prior to that though, I am going to Wilderness Road Regional Museum to give spinning lessons to a couple of adults who are interested.

Today though, I am working on kettle dying some Merino top using Wilton Icing Color, a food safe dye that with a vinegar bath will dye animal fiber.  If I am successful with this batch, I will try more.  If not, daughter will get several little pots of the concentrated color for her cake decorating.

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This batch is cooling and I think the colors are softer than I wanted, so maybe more dye needs to be used in the next pot once this one has cooled.

The featured photo today is the ridge to the south, ice encrusted trees, the clouds lifting, and the sun trying to peek through.  That was short living, it is again thick and gray, but nothing wet or frozen expected for a couple more days.  Sunshine would be welcomed.

Olio – January 5, 2019

Olio:  a miscellaneous collection of things.

Wow, that is the first time I have had to write 2019!  The days whiz by and suddenly it is the next year.  As a child, the years went by so slowly, and now they fly by before I have adjusted to it being a new one.

For the first time in what seems forever, we have sunshine.  The morning began bleak, rainy, and very windy.  We braved mixed winter precipitation to go to town and get breakfast and see what vendors came out for the winter Farmers’ Market.  The January to April markets are informal, the vendors being allowed to park their trucks and vans in parking spaces that are closed off and occupied by other vendors during the high season markets.  The morning goal was some pork, eggs, and breads and all were obtained before heading to the grocer for the non local needs.

The chicks are 9 weeks old tomorrow, so we have at least 14 or 15 more weeks before we will start seeing eggs from them.  Their adult plumage is developing and though not a heritage flock, they will be pretty and there will be a variety of egg colors from green, dark brown, medium brown, and light tan.  They have figured out the big girl feeder and the big girl water dispenser and are not afraid of the pop door to the outside anymore.  The first day they stayed inside, the next day most were escorted out by me and that night 5 of them were found huddled in an empty feed bucket under the coop.  Now, all of them can find their way out and back inside at night, though they wait until it is nearly dead dark to go in.

The Christmas week brought much family time.  We had an Italian style meal on Christmas eve with daughter’s family at her home, awoke to the empty house on Christmas day.  We celebrated quietly, having Huevos Rancheros and sausages for hubby and exchanging our gifts.  Christmas Day, daughter’s family came here for a mid afternoon turkey and ham dinner.  The next day, eldest son and eldest grandson came to celebrate and work on the deck.

Wanting to expand my fiber tools, I had asked for a 5 foot tri-loom and easel which I gladly received.

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Once I figured out how to assemble it, You Tube was visited to watch weavers using one.  There are several methods.  The first one I tried was called continuous loop weaving. You never cut your yarn weaving across and up and down by weaving the strand with a hook.

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The first triangle is a generous shawl  made with two skeins of my hand spun yarn, a very smooth Corriedale and a very textured blend of Merino, Tencel, and Mohair locks plyed with Wooly Nylon, a stretchy thin thread.  It was challenging as the textured yarn wanted to grab the other yarn and itself.  Once it was off the loom, I decided to make one to wear when I am doing the living history events on cool days.   It is being done with cut strand method and weaves on the diagonal.

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While trying to get it done for an event tomorrow, I was also trying to get a pair of fingerless mitts finished as well as I will be selling knitted and woven goods at Old Christmas at Wilderness Road Regional Museum and demonstrating spinning tomorrow.

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They were finished except for weaving in the ends while being passenger to breakfast, Farmers’ Market, and the grocery.  There are less than 20 rows to go on the shawl, so hopefully it will be woven though not washed and blocked for tomorrow.  It is my hand spun Coopworth from Hearts of the Meadow Farm.

I must admit, that weaving up my hand spun uses it much more quickly than knitting up the same amount of yarn.

As for the week after Christmas, eldest son and grand worked together to put the Trex surface boards on the deck.

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We are excited to be able to safely go out the French Doors of the dining room and not have a one story fall.  The deck surface and stairs are done.  The surface is maintenance free.  Unfortunately, the rails did not arrive in time for installation then, but they have now arrived and are due to be delivered this week.  When he has time, eldest will return and put up the railings, balusters, and post caps.  When the pressure treated posts have dried, they will be painted to match the railing and will be the only part of the deck that will require maintenance of repainting periodically.

While we were sorting tools, putting away cords, he and I tackled phase one of a major garage cleaning and reorganization, labeling boxes that contain power tools, making a pile of tile and metal fittings, Trex scraps, and other items to keep.  Most of that was moved to the barn today.  More will be moved another day and once the deck is done, the garage sorted out the rest of the way, a barn organization is in order.  It has become a repository of building materials, building equipment, and miscellaneous other stuff.  Some of it needs to go home with it’s owner, some can be sold or given away, some just needs to be straightened up so we can find it when a job needs it.  Some of the tile that was moved can be used to replace the water damaged bamboo floor in front of the walkout basement door.  That is another task for another time.

Back to weaving or the shawl won’t be done.  I hope you had a great holiday season and have faced the new year with hope and strength.

A Month on the Farm – 12/20/2018

Tomorrow marks the first official day of winter and the shortest day of the year here on the farm, though the meteorologic winter began weeks ago.  I’m ready for the days to lengthen.  Being much a creature of natural light cycles, I awake each day around 5 or 5:15 a.m., but don’t want to get up and disturb the household until the sky starts to lighten in the east.  By sundown and full on dark, I am ready to snuggle in for the night, trying to stay up and awake with night owl hubby at least until 10 or 10:30 p.m., often to fall asleep in my chair before drifting off to bed.

The month has been a whirlwind with 5 craft markets in 5 weeks that require loading and unloading the set up and product from the car.

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This Saturday is the last one for the year with no more until spring.

The month also has included 3 Christmas celebrations, two in costume at Wilderness Road Regional Museum for their music, Christmas treats, and evening lighted tours as I spun on a beautiful old Walking Wheel that with a tiny bit of TLC by me, now works.

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I love this photo with the shadow of the wheel on the wall.  This one is credited to April the organizer of the events.  There will be one more on Old Christmas that I will also attend in costume.  The third celebration was with the spinning group to which I belong.  I have not been a very good participant of late with everything else going on, but made a point of joining them for that as many folks that don’t get to come regularly come for this event and I enjoy seeing my friends.  I hope to get back to the weekly spin days after the holidays.

The month provided another challenge as I bought a dozen winter chicks about 4 1/2 weeks ago.  They were fortunately already 2 weeks old and beginning to feather out.  The “brooder” I use is a huge 110 gallon flexible plastic stock tank with a heat table for warmth.  Not a fan of having the birds in the house, the stock tank is in the garage on a carpet covered platform about 4 inches off the ground.  It was cold when we brought them home and ended up adding a 250W red heat lamp and covering half of the top with a mylar sheet to help retain the heat.  This was functioning okay until we were threatened with and received more than a foot of snow.  Wet snow this time of year often results in loss of power, so the brooder was dragged around the back of the house and into the walk out finished basement where there is a wood stove, before the snow began.  The stove was kept going until we were sure the power was not going out, about 3 days.

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The snow was beautiful and before it was totally gone, the brooder was loaded onto a sled and dragged back to the garage.  By Monday, the littles were 6 weeks old, fully feathered and too big for the stock tank, so the thoroughly cleaned coop was layered with about a foot of straw and they were moved to tough it out without the benefit of supplemental heat.  We have had several very cold nights and all is well in the coop.  The basement then received a deep cleaning to remove the dust from having the chicks indoors for a week.

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I am working on teaching them to use the adult no waste feeder and no waste waterer, while providing the hanging feeder as well.  They are beginning to get their adult colorations.  By mid week next week they should know that food and water are in the coop and that is where to return when hungry and at night and they will be let out into the run.  I fear they are still small enough to get through the holes in the fence though and I don’t like to panic them by trying to catch them but until they will follow me back to the run for treats, they can’t free range.

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This view if you have followed the blog for long, often appears.  The end of that ridge in the distance drops to a gap to the New River.  That view is one of my favorites from the farm and it was just over 13 years ago that we saw this property for the first time in early December.  By January, it was ours to plan and build on.  If you can love a property in the bleak of winter, you can really love it anytime.

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The deck progressed in the past month as well, with a Thanksgiving weekend being spent by son and daughter in law preparing it for the decking, rails, and balusters.  Those materials are to be delivered tomorrow and by the first of the year, hopefully, we will be able to safely step out of the French doors of the dining room onto a solid surface, not a one story drop.  It is deceptive as the stairs come down on a flat created and held in place by a gorgeous stone retaining wall.  The deck itself is one story up from the grade below.

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With the prep for Christmas, the various events, cooking for family for Thanksgiving and preparing to cook for Christmas, little knitting or spinning have been done except for two pair of wool socks for a tiny farmer, the toddler son of one of the regular vendors at the market.  They have been knit this week after she asked last Saturday.  I hope they fit the little guy and can be passed down to his baby brother in another couple of years.

I hope you have a very Merry Christmas or other seasonal holiday of this time of year and a Happy New Year.

The Crazy Cat Lady – 12/14/18

But not cats, spinning equipment.  A while back, I posted that I finally had all the spinning equipment that I needed and it was all comfortable to me.  Well, an opportunity presented itself this past summer to purchase an antique sitting quill spinning wheel from Pennsylvania.  It couldn’t be shipped, but a friend was an acquaintance of the seller and was going to be in her area a few weeks after and she said she would pick it up and take it to her home until we could connect.  We live about 3-4 hours apart.  She and her husband were going to be setting up at the Shenandoah Fiber Festival in September and though that is also 3+ hours from home, we can visit our eldest son and his family in that region, a plan was hatched.

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This beautiful little wheel joined the huge walking wheel in our loft.  She has been taken to a couple of living history events as she travels in the back of my car nicely.  But this meant that the Ashford Traveller that I had been taking wouldn’t go anymore, and though a pretty little wheel, wasn’t what I wanted for everyday spinning, her bobbins were too small and I didn’t want to spend more money to get the larger flyer, so she was offered for sale and sold quickly.  The Ashford came apart enough to box it in a medium moving box and it could be shipped.  That left me with no everyday wheel and I wanted something with huge bobbins and yet small enough to travel, so Miss Polly came home with me, a Spinolution Pollywog, a tiny little 8 pounder.

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So now, I had the 49″ diameter great wheel, the sitting quill wheel, Miss Poly, and a gorgeous Golding drop spindle.  Then I found another Golding spindle that called to me and I purchased it.

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The Celtic sheep spindle is a joy and spindles are so portable to take spinning anywhere, anytime.

Yesterday was our spinning group’s annual Christmas Party with Dirty Santa exchange, potluck snacks, and camaraderie.  It is always a fun afternoon with the opportunity to give away fibery items you no longer want, sell those that you don’t want but don’t want to give away, and of course the Dirty Santa fun.  One of our group members has turned her interest to quilting in the past few years and has dropped out of coming to the weekly gatherings and the parties and she decided that since she was no longer using her wheel, that it should find a new home.  The hostess picked it up from her home and brought it to her own home.  The original owner did not want to sell it, she just wanted it to go to a new loving home.  The wheel is a 40 year old Jensen, hand made wheel and it is beautiful.  That wheel came home with me yesterday.

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She is larger than my sitting quill, but smaller than the great wheel, a large sturdy Saxony style wheel of Cherry wood and she glows.  With the leather fittings and old style hooks, she also can go to living history events with or instead of the sitting quill wheel.  The loft now houses 4 wheels, I’m running out of space, but not out of love for the art and the beautiful equipment.

Perhaps an intervention is in order.  At least an organization so that I can use them and get to the fiber to spin on them.

Farm life, knitting and spinning, cooking and family