Category Archives: Family time

Tis the Season – Dec. 6, 2018

The tradition in our household since daughter was old enough to notice, was that no Christmas decorations could be put up until after her late November birthday.  She no longer lives with us, nor was she even in town on her birthday this year, but no decorations went up.  Nearly a week passed and I still wasn’t in the mood.

December is a bitter sweet month.  Both of my parents passed away in December, my mother in 1987 at only 63 years young, and my Dad just a couple of years ago.  Christmas was always a fun time for me when our children were young, as we could get them special gifts of items they desired but wouldn’t spend the money on at other times of the year.  We always had extended family for the special holiday meals, and an Open House for hubby’s staff and all the neighbors.  When our kids were grown and gone, beginning families of their own, one or more of them would come home, or we would travel to be with one of them for Christmas.  This year we will awaken on Christmas morning with no kids or grandkids in the house.  We will go to daughter’s on Christmas Eve, she will bring her kids over for Christmas dinner later on Christmas Day, and eldest son and eldest grandson will be here on the 26th.

Two days ago, I put on some Christmas music and began hauling the boxes of Santa’s and the Snow village up.  A good thorough cleaning always precedes setting it up as dusting for the next couple of weeks is onerous with dozens of Santa and Christmas gnomes adorning the book shelves, mantle, and window sills.  The Christmas towels, table cloth, throw pillows, and wall hangings were put in place.  The tiny tree of Hallmark mini’s that used to grace my office was put on the jelly cupboard and lit and I quit.

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Santas

Today, before we get snow this weekend, we drove to the local tree farm to get a tree.  Normally we walk the hills and choose one, some have been as much as 12 feet tall as our living room in our log home can accommodate it.  There were no other cars in the lot in the early afternoon on a work and school day and we walked up to get the tag to hang on the tree we wanted, and there by the building was a beautifully shaped little 6.5 foot precut tree.  We took it, had a fresh cut on the trunk and drilled for the stand that we bought from them several years ago.  The tree was small enough to fit inside the SUV with one rear seat down.

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One of the taller ones from years past.

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Today’s small addition.

The house is decorated, we listened to Christmas music as we decorated it, topping it yet again with the huge Starfish that came from a cruise with youngest son  about 5 years ago.  It makes a good tree topper, a reminder of a good week with them.

And ended our day with a comfort food meal of turkey pot pie, using some of the remaining Thanksgiving turkey.

Wind down, wind up – 11/24/2018

The first craft show is done.  It wasn’t a bust, but not a great success either.  There were many vendors with holiday decorations made with artificial flowers and purchased craft store doodads, a few nice country furniture makers, and too many vendors of body products.  My spot, though on an inside aisle corner was toward the end of the path though, so many other soap makers had already tempted the buyers.  My hand spun, hand knit wearables were out of the price market for most of the buyers.  It was an experiment and probably won’t be repeated.

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Additional hats and mitts are being knit to further supply the upcoming three weekend holiday markets.

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Two new 3 step displays have been purchased for the soaps, lotion bars, and salves.  They need to be stained and poly finished before next weekend.

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Their footprint is about the same as the crates, but raises the product to a more visible position.  As most of my soaps are vegan, I have purchased some organic soy wax and will make vegan lotion bars and salves as well and will have a vegan display and a soy free display.  They will be raised above the table height enough that men’s grooming boxes and beard/body oils can be displayed below.

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Each of my children were given a crewel work Christmas stocking that I made when they were infants and which they still use.  Each grandchild has been given one, either quilted or knitted intarsia.  Our 7th grandchild was born this past summer and she will get her stocking this year.  It still needs to be lined and some add on ornamentation sewn on and each stocking has a tag sewn inside that is a cross stitched message that says “Made with love, Mom or Grandmom, year” that needs to be stitched and added.

The afternoon of the craft show, our eldest son arrived on a bus to continue working on rebuilding our deck and reinstalling the Direct TV dish.  Toward the end of summer, he and his wife set in concrete, a metal post off the corner of the house for it to be mounted on, but it needed to set.  In the meantime, they had a medical emergency now ok which delayed further work, but he came to get more done.  His wife and son came Wednesday after work to celebrate Thanksgiving.

On one of our excursions out to get supplies for the deck and dish, we went to Rural King and they had chicks.  We came home with the lumber and hardware, set up the big rubber brooder tub and heat table with plans to go back the next day to get the chicks.  Instead, we had to go back out that afternoon as we realized that something had been left at one of the shops, so bedding, feed, and a new water base were purchased and a dozen two week old chicks were brought home for spring laying.

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The Buff Orpington and Welsummers that are almost two have not resumed laying since they molted and we have not gotten a single egg in a month.  Eggs had to be purchased for the family staying here and for Thanksgiving cooking.  We got 3 each Welsummers, Mottled Javas, New Hampshires, and Olive Eggers.  Being almost three weeks old now, they are feathering out and will soon try to fly out of the brooder.  A screen is over the top and the heat lamp that had to be added with the heat table because of the cold in the garage will hopefully thwart that attempt.  The hens will be moved to the cull coop as soon as the fence is fixed there and the coop will be scrubbed and sanitized so the chicks can be relocated out there when they are 6 or 7 weeks old.

Thanksgiving dinner was celebrated with two of our children and their families.  The almost 17 pound local turkey was spatchcocked by eldest son, the sides assembled and a delicious, hearty, mostly local meal was group prepared and enjoyed by all.  The left over turkey enjoyed again for lunch yesterday, and gallons of turkey broth made and frozen for cooking over the next few weeks.  Eldest son went home with some.

Today is our local granddaughter’s 7th birthday and we will be celebrating her birthday and her Mom’s tonight as her Mom will be away for hers.  That will end the November birthday’s for our family. Jim took me to my favorite local restaurant for my birthday last week and I had an awesome risotto with pumpkin, mushrooms, cranberries, and pecans.

During evening hours after a day’s work and knitting have worn me out, caused joint pain, or just stress from the day, I have turned to the calming, meditative art of Zentangle.  The two tiles below are the efforts of the past week, never spending more than about 20 minutes a day of refocus and calming.

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Fickle November, the Birthday month – Nov. 5, 2018

November rides a roller coaster, it is warm and wet one day, cold the next.  The nights dip to freezing one night and stay at 50ºf the next.  The heatpump goes on, then shuts off.  The sweaters and jackets are worn then removed and draped over a chair until you chill again.

Saturday was sunny, windy, and cold until afternoon.  Yesterday was cold in the morning, but the wind had died down and the later day was gorgeous, then it rained all night.  Today is gray so far but mild and getting up into the mid 60’s with more rain tonight and tomorrow morning.  After tomorrow the temperatures drop again, some rainy days, some sunny with rain Friday and a low in the 20’s.  Mountain snow shower weather.

With the end of Daylight Savings time, it is dark so early and sleep schedules disrupted until the senior bodies adjust to the change. Awake earlier than I want to be as I usually awaken around 5:15 and ready to go to bed way too early to sleep through the night.  We will adjust, eventually.

November is the month of birthdays, there are 6 in our family spread from the 4th to the 29th.  Daughter’s is the last of the month and one daughter in law starts the next month just a few days later, but is the only December one.

Tucked in the midst of the birthday’s is Thanksgiving.  We get our turkey each year from a local farm, fresh the day we pick it up.  By the weekend before Thanksgiving, they are huge, usually about 20 pounds.  A few year’s ago, elder son wanted to try spatchcocking or butterflying the turkey and we struggled to cut the backbone out as instructed, put a ton of herbed butter under the skin and in a very short time, like 90 minutes, the 20 pound turkey was done, beautifully browned, and juicy.

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I have done one without son’s help, but it was smaller and we should have a huge one this year as we have selected one of the latest pick up dates so it can stay fresh until we cook it.  Hopefully son’s family is coming and daughter’s family is coming, so we will have a houseful of family and plenty of good food.

November is the beginning of the holiday craft season with a big one I don’t vend, but love to attend coming up this weekend.  The first one I vend is the following weekend.  And taxes are due this month, the second half of the real estate taxes and the personal property tax on the vehicles and my shop equipment.

November is the month that a calendar is needed to just keep track of “Who’s on first!”

The Wanderers Have Returned -8/28/18

Our vacation to Hawaii was both wonderful and fraught with stress.  Between cancelled and delayed flights we lost the Priority Boarding and extended leg room for tall hubby that we had paid extra to have, and resulted in late boarding and often very poor seating in both directions.  We were able to get a refund for the additional fees after arriving home.  While away, we had a family emergency back home that isn’t my story to tell, but that seems to be resolving hopefully.  The pending hurricane while in Hawaii was also stressful.  Though some parts of islands were badly damaged by flood waters from the heavy rain, though the storm was to the west of us and we were on the west side of the island, it was the east side that got slammed by the rain, we only had lighter rain and high rough surf.

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East side of O’ahu, first half of week, sunrises.

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Steep volcanic mountains behind the house.  These mountains are where Jurrasic movies and Jumanji were filmed.

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Lush Airbnb in Kona Hawaii where we spent second half of week. Luxury, pool, gardens.  Thanks to our family members who arranged this.

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Desolate beauty in the lava fields of Hawaii.

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Heavy surf from the hurricane off the coast.

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And the gorgeous sunset from a second floor open restaurant also from the storm off the coast.

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A new treat, that fortunately we can’t get here, or I would blow up like a balloon in weight.  It is Hawaiian Shave Ice.  A conical shaped cup half filled with shave ice (it doesn’t have a “D” on the end to make it shaved), a scoop of vanilla ice cream, more shave ice, up to three syrup flavors of your choice, molded into the rounded shape, and topped if you desire with various other toppings.  Served with a spoon and a straw.  They were enjoyed several times on Kona.

Back home after the delays and cancellations and more than 25 hours of airport and air flight time just to get home, we are still jet lagged even after two days home.

The garden had reverted to a weedy mess in 10 days and the first day home was spent weed whacking the aisles, hand weeding the beds, removing blister beetles, picking the too big cucumbers for the chickens, grabbing a few tomatoes and a pumpkin out of the garden.  Day two was spent on the riding mower, reducing the very tall lawn to a manageable length after the 10 days away and rainfall while we were gone.

The driveway took a hit from the rain, the blade is going to have to be afixed to the tractor and some grading done.  The two currently unused chicken pens are more than waist high in weedy growth, another weed whacking session is needed or to borrow a couple of goats (not really an option unfortunately.)  Sometimes, I think a couple of goats would be great to have to reduce some of the overgrowth in areas that can’t be mowed.

The Asian Pears and tiny misshapen apples are ripe.  This evening the apples will be pressed into cider and some cider frozen for winter.  Some of the Asian Pears are going to be made into a couple of batches of jam.  I would like to press the rest into pear cider, but lack my own press.

The fog is finally lifting, so some more yardwork is in order.

Love being home on our mountain farm.

Away and back – 8/10/18

My visit with my siblings is over.  Instead of the one night I was going to stay, because I finished the deck wood cleanup  on Tuesday, I chose to stay for two nights.  Several of us walked up the mountain to where my Dad’s ashes are scattered and we laid flowers there, had a few quiet reflective moments, shed a few tears and hiked back down.

The group this year was small, my brother and sister in law, their younger son, his wife, and their two sons, my sister and her young adult granddaughter, a family friend, and me.  We played some games, chatted, enjoyed an adult beverage or two (not the two littles but all of the adults), ate, laughed, cried, and had each other to lean on emotionally and harrass as siblings do for a few days.

Home by lunch time today, a quick trip back out to deliver the Friday eggs and to haul the trailer a few towns over to pick up the riding mower, back to our community to  the Ag Fair to take my two knitted items for the judging tonight and the display tomorrow.  Tomorrow, we will go back to the Fair and enjoy some of the fair exhibits, demonstrations, and food.

If it is possible to be both tired and refreshed, I guess that is where I am. Below is Crenshaw, the cottage the family has used the first full week in August since my younger brother was a little dude.  Now we are all senior citizens, the patriarchs are all remembered on the plaques in the header, I am now the oldest of the clan.

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I did some knitting and finished reworking the fingerless mitt pattern and the sample pair.

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My sister is my hand model and I think she wanted to take them home.  Maybe a pair will show up in Kansas.

 

 

Sunday Was Not A Day of Rest – 7/16/18

The young one was still complaining of a belly ache and spent the day resting and sleeping on the couch in the midst of the household chaos.  He and his granddad, who also didn’t feel well were the only ones who rested and worked at recovery.

Sausage gravy and biscuits were made, but only son and I ate them. Daughter and her two littles arrived just before 10 a.m. with a flat of jars.  Everyone was Deep Woods Off sprayed, given pails of varying description and off we went to pick enough berries to make a batch of jam.  The littlest, almost 7 year old ate everything she picked.  The eleven year old ate about half of what he picked, but daughter and I were able to accumulate enough berries that after we picked over them and crushed them, we had almost 8 cups, enough for about a double recipe of wildberry jam.  While the jars heated in the canner, sandwiches were made for all who wanted one and once that was out of the way, the berry jam was started, jarred, and water bathed.

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We ended up with eight 12 oz jars of wildberry jam for her.  One was left uncanned, back left for them to begin enjoying and so it didn’t have to be canned in two batches.  My water bath canner holds 7 narrow mouth pints, the big pressure canner holds 10, but it also tends to bubble over when you fill it an inch above the lids to water bath, so we only canned 7 for her pantry shelves and one she took home in hand to put in the refrigerator.  The remaining 7 will be taken over to her house today along with a hat that was left behind.

About two years ago, the top boards on our large south facing deck began to decay and I put a foot through a board one day while out watering deck plants.  In an attempt to keep with the green building theme that we had adopted while building the house, the deck was built with borate treated wood instead of pressure treated wood and we later found out that it should be under roof to make it last.  It isn’t under roof, it gets wet and it bakes, getting too hot to enjoy on a summer day.  We began replacing the rotting boards with pressure treated ones, but then it became apparent a year ago that the entire top needed replacing and we began looking into Trex or one of it’s competitors for durability and so it didn’t have to be restained every couple of years.  Deconstruction was begun but with his schedule, it sat over the winter.  His wife worked on it some while she was here farm sitting in February, and he attacked it yesterday with intent. To help speed things along, I joined him to stack boards that were to be burned, removed nails, screws, and brackets from boards.  Also I was cutting boards to a length to fit in a burn barrel and cutting out sections that were still sound, though they were few and far between, most of the boards are rotted to mulch consistency.  Unfortunately, removing the boards, we realize that the joists are also bad for the top couple of inches, so it looks like we will be starting over.  I hate this for son, he built the deck for us, reinforcing it with hurricane brackets and making it solid and large and we enjoyed it for about a decade.  As the day wore on, with us working together in the heat (both of us are fair, so it is long pants, long sleeves, and broad brimmed hats, we made good progress.

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The section with no top used to be about a third again larger to the left of what you see, so most of the top boards are gone except just in front of the dining room doors and the joists for part of the large part of the deck are down.

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Flipping the boards to remove nails and screws revealed some interesting life forms.  This is a fungi, I guess.  It was about the size of a quarter, some others like it were smaller, but they looked like sea anemones that looked like they should be swaying in the ocean.

 

We finally quit around 4, so he could pack up his car and take the still ailing grandson home.  We took them into town for a bowl of Chinese hand pulled noodle soup and sent them on their way.

Once home, sore and tired, but fed, the weekend pickles making results were shelved.

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So pretty to look at and enjoy when we need a jar of jam or pickles.  The ferment was tasted and it is delicious, it was refrigerated this morning.  As soon as there are more cucumbers and jalapeños to pick, another jar will be started.  It is about time to start this year’s kraut, I sent the last jar home with son as they eat more of it than do we and it only takes a few days to ferment.  I think I will wait for the ferment weights to arrive to help hold it in it’s own brine though.

Today, I really am going to rest.  I am running on fumes and need some stiff sore muscles to have a chance to recover.  Yesterday’s expected rain never happened, today’s chance has dropped from an almost sure thing to it may not happen.  The flowers and garden are getting too dry, it is hot and brittle.  We need some rain.

Another Day, Another 16 pints – 7/14/18

Of canned goods.  Saturday mornings are Farmers’ Market morning and breakfast out.  For the past 3 weekends with the farm apprentice here, we have gone to our local diner that is open only for breakfast and lunch.  For the past two Saturday’s, that breakfast has not sat well with me.  I don’t know if they have changed cooking oil or brand of bacon or whether I have just become intolerant to anything with oil in the morning, I have been eating whole grain toast with homemade jam for several weeks.  Today however, after a couple of hours, grandson said his stomach hurt too, so something wasn’t right.

Since I had just been to market Wednesday evening and with him going home tomorrow, I only got pickling cucumbers and zucchini to make pickles, along with a bit of salad greens.

Son arrived around lunch time and daughter had asked him if he would put is stone masonry skills to work to reset a huge rock in her driveway retaining wall before her homeowner’s association got after her about it.  Once I had fixed him a sandwich, we loaded the Xterra with mortar mix, sand, lime, the metal wheelbarrow that doesn’t go in my garden, and the tools.  A stop at Lowe’s to get a bit more sand and an afternoon of his toil and labor while daughter and I sideline supervised and the wall is repaired.

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Before he arrived, I had cut the cucumbers, onions, and peppers and salted them to put in the fridge to wilt and drain.  The zucchini and remaining cucumbers were made into dill spears and zucchini pickles and canned.

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Tonight after dinner was prepared, enjoyed, and cleaned up, he installed the replacement burner for my glass top stove.  My preferred small burner, due to being a lefty, is the front left and it has burned out twice in the eleven years we have been here.  I had ordered a new one, but didn’t get brave enough to install it myself. After the stove was cleaned up, repaired, and put back in place, the cucumbers that had been sitting in salt all day were drained and rinsed and the bread and butter brine made.  Eight pints of spicy bread and butter pickles were made and canned tonight.  A total of 16 pints of pickles made today.

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Tomorrow, daughter and grands are going to come over to pick wild berries so that I can make and can a batch of wildberry jam for her household.

Grandson spent the afternoon and evening still dealing with a tummy ache.  Hopefully, he will be better tomorrow before they have to drive back to their home with a box of jams and pickles, as well as the poster and basketball he got at camp.  It has been wonderful having him here for the past 3 1/2 weeks.

Farm Apprentice-7/13/18

My farm apprentice goes home on Sunday.  We have had 3 1/2 great weeks with our eldest grandson.  His first full week here he attended basketball camp at Virginia Tech.  His stay has been a blend of fun and work and I am going to miss his help on the work days.

This morning, before anyone else arose, I did get three more of the saplings planted.  It was still cool outdoors.  Using the tractor bucket, I scraped off the grass in patches the width of the bucket and about 3 feet across, then hand dug holes in the bare soil.  After delivering eggs in town, we purchased a few more bags of hardwood mulch and my farm apprentice was given another opportunity to drive the tractor as he delivered the bags to the newly planted trees.

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I wouldn’t trust him alone, but he can drive it slowly with reminders.  He did have a glitch with stopping once and almost took out one of the new saplings, but he got better as I let him move it around as we moved mulch and water to the new trees and the extra mulch to the garden.

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They are tiny now, but hopefully will grow to continue providing a wind barrier on the west side of the house.

I took over to mow a path through an area that is outside of the hayfields and repeated the removal of the grass layer to make spaces for the two sweet gums trees.  We didn’t want them in the lawn area, having had several in our yard when we lived in Virginia Beach.  He helped dig holes and plant the two remaining trees.  We then spread two of the bags of mulch in vegetable garden aisles over thick paper layers.

Last evening, when I went out to collect eggs, I also collected a hand full of Jalapeño peppers and two pickling cucumbers and started a ferment of them, a half onion, some fresh dill, dried dill seed, bay leaves, and sea salt.  They will be refrigerated once ready and enjoyed later.

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The rest of today I will rest and knit. Tomorrow, my apprentice’s Dad will come and Sunday, they will return to their home.

Garden Therapy – 5/4/2018

It has been a rough week with a lost and finally found cell phone resulting in an extra 3 hours on the road on Sunday morning.  A sprained wrist by hubby playing basketball with eldest grandson, that seems to be healing.  One of our dogs taking off on Sunday night while she was visiting our town family and not being found.  All of this softened some by having our eldest grandson here with us for the past 4 days.  This morning early, we put him on a bus for home to play in his basketball tournament this weekend.  He very responsibly checked in at every stop on his route and is safely back with his parents.

All this required some garden therapy.  I have been slow to get the garden up and running this year with the fickle early to mid April weather and foot of snow.  I did get the onions and garlic in the ground when appropriate and they are up and looking good.  The asparagus finally broke ground just before we left last weekend and have been enjoyed a couple of times with another harvest done this morning that will probably find it’s way to our daughter’s kitchen for her to enjoy as well.

After the bus departure and the Friday morning egg delivery, we went and bought starter plants, 4 each slicing tomatoes, Amish paste tomatoes, Serano peppers, Jalapeno peppers, and spinach plants.  Once home and awaiting the arrival of the delivery and installation of our over the range vented microwave to replace the one that failed a few weeks ago, I attacked the garden.  It is still early, so most of the weeds are easy to manage, plus I put a thick layer of spoiled hay over everything in the fall.  A long bed was weeded and the tomatoes planted, the end of the long bed containing the garlic was planted with the hot peppers, another long bed cleared and two kinds of peas planted, and the spinach that I started as well as the heartier ones we bought were tucked into the end of a 4 X 4 block bed.  In a couple more weeks, the corn, beans, cucumbers, and pumpkins will go in and if I can find some Poblano peppers, they will be planted also.  The nursery said their Poblano seed was bad with very poor germination and they only have a few plants too small to sell yet.  The half barrels that used to grace the deck with herbs had to be moved off the deck in the fall when it started to fail and is in the process of rebuilding, so two of them were moved to the side of the house where I exit to the garden and coop and planted this morning with new rosemary plants, wild flower seed in one, and edible flower seed in the other and fencing around them to keep the chicken from hopping up and digging around in them.

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The tree nursery bed needs the trees removed and transplanted and one more long bed to weed.

I guess I should dedicate a short time each morning when I go to let the chickens out and each evening when I go to lock them up to weed one bed or one aisle and maybe the garden won’t get ahead of me this year.

The microwave installers kindly left me the box it came in as well as a washer and dryer box they had in their truck so perhaps I can mulch down some aisles to also make the task easier.

We continue to be saddened and worried about our country pup lost and hungry in town, but have done about all we can but keep hoping that she finally comes to someone and they can get her back to us.

And So We Endure Jan. 14, 2018

After the nearly 3 weeks of Arctic weather, we were due for a reprieve.  Daughter and family had moved  out nearly all of their furniture that had been moved in for their period of house sharing with us and our furniture that had been relocated to other parts of the house or stored returned.  Jim and I dismantled the bunk bed, storing the full size bottom bunk in the garage until they could pick it up yesterday and the twin size top bunk set up in a corner of the basement to provide another place to put family members if we have too many for the other beds.  The smaller south bedroom was scrubbed down, vacuumed, dusted, and the full size bed, tall chest, nightstand, and rocking chair returned to it.  New Navy blue curtains were hung, but once out of the package, I realized that they are not lined, so some lining fabric will be purchased and I will make the lining and sew it in.

Monday was supposed to be the first warmer day and the grand’s first day at their new school, but Ole Man Winter decided to play a trick and instead of a warmer dry day, we got an ice storm warning.  Schools closed throughout the region in anticipation and we ended up with the grands with us.  Grandson arrived in a too small knit hat that looked like a mouse had chewed it.  He helped me pick yarns and I told him I would trade him a new hat for the one he was wearing

Though initially we thought that it was unnecessary to close the schools, we did indeed get ice.   We got the grands home before it got too bad, but Monday night Jim went out to try to get the two male dogs back in and slipped, landing hard on his hip.  I didn’t hear him calling for help until he had crawled back to the front porch in pain.  As the night wore on, his more intense pain subsided, but he has continued to have a lot of soreness, not enough to keep us from our walks when weather permitted.  Tuesday the schools were to be delayed two hours to give the roads a chance to clear, but by 9 a.m., they again closed.  We were unsure we could get down our mountain road to get the grands, so SIL had to wait for the alternative care program to get straightened out and took the kids there, going in to work late.

The week did finally warm up and we enjoyed a few nice day, enough for the ice on the creeks and the blocks from the chicken watering pan to thaw.  Each day the pan was dumped and fresh water poured in and the yard and chicken run were littered with blocks the shape of the pan or the bucket.  Friday we got much needed rain, and mud.  The dogs come and go through the front door as the deck repair is still in progress out the back.  Late Friday, the rain turned to sleet then to snow and the temperature dropped.  It was 40ºf colder yesterday than Friday.  We got no more than a dusting as the snow blew horizontally until early afternoon when the wind died down, the clouds broke but the thermometer didn’t rise.  Our high yesterday was 21.  Last night to 10.

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The cold, blustery, snowy day encouraged me to continue putting the house together, the front bedroom received the same treatment that the other one got last weekend.  The walls swept down, windows and floor vacuumed and mopped or wiped down, fresh linen on the bed, the heavy quilt that has been stored for 3 years was returned to the bed and new insulated, room darkening curtains hung.

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Friday night when they came to pick up their dog and two housecats, he got his new hat, just in time for yesterday’s frigid weather.

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He had it on yesterday when they came to get the bed and a few more boxes.  I hope it keeps him warm as we endure another week of subfreezing days and bitter nights before the next break.  In the meantime, I am again accumulating blocks of ice from the water pans and buckets and though I thought I only got 1 egg yesterday, this morning when I let the hens out into the yard, I found 4 more, frozen and cracked in a corner of the coop, not in nesting boxes where they could be found.