Barrow and Bear

A Week on the Farm – May 28, 2016

Yesterday was our eldest son’s birthday.  It seems like yesterday that I was standing in our new kitchen (we had just bought a house and moved in only two weeks before) shelling fresh peas that we had bought that morning at the Farmers’ Market in Virginia Beach. We had also taken a walk up Mt. Trashmore, a city park build on the old landfill, with hopes that it would stimulate labor.  It did, sort of.  At any rate, the peas did not get eaten that night, a stay in the labor unit at the hospital instead and his addition to our family the next day.  He is a delightful, intelligent, grown man now, 36 years young with his own wife and our eldest grandson.

The week has been a mixture of rain and sun with only a little gardening done.  Our neighbor has an overgrown Bearded Iris bed with three colors of Iris in it and he has known for years that I wanted a bit of each to go with my Grape Iris and Dutch Iris that were already in my gardens.  I had permission to come get some, but always waited until they had finished blooming until I thought about heading up to get some and didn’t want to dig without knowing which clusters to dig from in order to get a bit of each color.  He called one night this week and told me to come up with a shovel and bucket and I came home with some of each color.  They were planted in a flower garden that I had begun early spring above the vegetable garden.  Next year they will have multiplied and I will have more beautiful color.

Yesterday, I also stopped and got flowers for the wooden wheelbarrow that my Dad made for me about a dozen years ago.  As the weather began turning to spring this year, I brought it in to the garage and refurbished it, putting a new axle, handle and leg supports on it.  It also was screwed instead of nailed together in my efforts.

Barrow and Bear

The little carved bear on the edge of the porch was a craft show purchase many years ago.  It is chain saw carved and holds a solar light that comes on at dusk, not providing much light, but a guide to where the edge of the front porch is located on a dark night.

Some preparation of products for my shop were done with all three salves made and a couple of scents of lotion bars formulated.  While doing them, I prepared a written lesson in salve preparation and making and lotion bar recipe and instruction for a class I will be teaching in the fall at a retreat.

I got brave this week too and finally tackled dyeing a skein of yarn for my shop.  My first attempt was not my hand spun, but a 150 yard skein of Suri Alpaca.  For my first attempt, I used the kettle dyed method and Greener Shades dye.  I tried dyeing half for 20 minutes longer than the other half, hoping for a two toned monochromatic skein.

Ruby and Garnet

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I don’t think I achieved what I was hoping for, but I am fairly pleased with the result.  I have several skeins of undyed natural white yarns in the shop and I will be dyeing several of them in the next few days experimenting with adding more color.

Two days of this week were spent in preparation and recovery from one of the dreaded diagnostics that senior citizens are encouraged to endure.  At least I don’t have to go through it again for another decade.

Today began with a solo run to the Farmers’ Market for salad, broccoli, a cucumber already, herbs, bread, and flowers.  Jim had breakfast with me in town and then took off on the BBH to ride the Blue Ridge Parkway and grab a hot dog in Roanoke.

After my early return, my day has been spent mostly outdoors, weeding and cleaning up the shrub bed along the front of the house.  It needs new mulch, but I didn’t want to drive back into town.  Pushing the mower up and down the hill by the driveway to clear around the shrubs growing there, the meat chickens pen which was up to my waist with grass and lambs quarters, the area in front of the Huck’s coop so that a containment pen could be made for the anticipated chicks.  We are on chick watch.  The next couple of days should produce our first batch of chicks for the season.  Their coop and pen await.

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A plastic chicken wire pen attached to step in poles awaits them.  The electric fence will be restrung this evening after I re-hydrate and it cools off some.

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The other layers (who have contributed to the eggs being sat) and the proud Papa continue to harass the two gals sitting.  One hen insists on laying her egg in the nest of the first broody each day.  I marked the original 10 under her and then quit as I didn’t want to disturb her so much.  Whatever doesn’t hatch in the next couple of days will be discarded.  The same will be true mid June when the second hatch is due.  I need to block off the nesting box for the first hatch before they coop up tonight.  I don’t want a newly hatched chick to be pecked or accidentally fall out the pop door as her nest is right at that door.  One of the girls has taken to pecking the egg of one of the Americaunas each day if I don’t collect them as soon as I realize they are in a nest.  They aren’t totally breaking the shell, nor eating the egg, just slightly fracturing the shell.  I hate having to discard an egg most days.

We are expecting rain for the next two days.  I may take advantage of the wet soil to continue the weeding of the garden.  I still don’t have the popcorn and pumpkins planted.  I did re-weed the blueberries today and there will be a small harvest of them.  One of the aisles between beds was weeded and covered with spoiled hay today as well. I have concluded that from now on, I will just buy my turnips at the Farmers’ Market.  I harvested the first few that I planted and they are all full of the little white worm that torments me each time I plant them.  I have used wood ash in their planting row and around on top with limited success in the past, but it didn’t work this year.  I guess the chickens will enjoy them.

Our neighbor that hays our fields came over to look at my brush hog today.  He is going to take it home and refurbish it for me.  Rough ground and rocks are hard on them and the design of the stablizer wheel on the back of the one we own is poor, causing the shaft that holds it to stretch out and has made the wheel unstable.  One of the bolts that prevents wobble is bent too and he is either going to cut it off and replace it or just weld those two pieces together to prevent the wobble.  It has gotten so that it gouges  the ground when I mow.

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