A Week On The Farm May 14,, 2016

This was the last week of exams and graduation at the University in town.  The event swells the population of town for a few days before the massive exodus and quiet of the summer.  Trying to go anywhere in town during the past few days has been an adventure.  Undergraduate Commencement Ceremonies were are 8:30 a.m. yesterday morning and even trying to get granddaughter to preschool was a challenge.  Many of the families started clearing out today.  After we had a family day in the gardens today during and between rain showers, we decided that we wanted to go to Mellow Mushroom for pizza and a good beer.  When we arrived at about 7 p.m., we were the 11th party of 5 to check in thus it would be a 90 to 120 minute wait, with a tired 4 year old and a nine year old.  We bailed and went down the street to a local Italian Restaurant, were seated immediately and got a good pizza, just not the one we had set out to get.

This morning, bright and early, Jim took off on his BBH motorcycle and met 25 other bikes from the Roanoke Hog group for an overnight ride into West Virginia for a “Hillbillie Hotdog”  Yup, it is a real place.  They have other stops to visit during their two day ride, dealt with some real rain but he seems to be having fun.  I took off not long after him and made the weekly run to the Blacksburg Farmers Market, coming home with lots of vegetables, a bouquet of flowers, some bread and bagels, and some sausages.  Another stop at the local Super Value market for some local pasture raised beef and a weekly run to the grocer for the items that fill lunch boxes and make snacks for the kids.

After our grocery run, K and I tackled the garden.  I have been lacking in the motivation to get out there and get a handle on the overgrowth of Lambs Quarters, that were so thick, it looked like I had sown it as a cover crop.  Every time I have had the time to go out, it has rained.  We toughed some showers, increasing wind, and a drop in temperature, but we succeeded in getting the two beds that are already fully or partially planted with garlic, onions, radishes, Lacinato kale, turnips, peas, chard, and cabbages cleared.  Two paths were cleared and the grands came out.  With all of us working, we finished pulling the weeds in the upper part of the garden.

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The lower garden is still a mess.

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We have two nights in the 30’s then I will get the peppers, cucumbers, and beans planted, then attack this part of the garden for the popcorn, pumpkins, and Anasazi beans.  I still need to find a place for the sweet potatoes and get some flowers planted.

We made our first harvest today.

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A handful of Easter Egg radishes.

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Broody Momma, let herself get removed from the nest a few days ago by another hen who laid her egg then left.  In the meantime, Broody Momma moved to the nest with that day’s eggs in it.  We moved her back over 10 eggs, hoping that they didn’t sit unwarmed for too long.  She hasn’t been bothered for a few days, so we aren’t sure how many she has under her or if they are viable.  If they are, we should have a brood of chicks around Memorial Day.

It has been a good week, but wet.  I have succeeded in getting my 10,000 steps in all but one day.

5 thoughts on “A Week On The Farm May 14,, 2016”

    1. I’m glad your soap arrived and you like it. The double batch of lavender is curing and will be ready in about a month. I recommended your trilogy (I see #4 is coming out) to a friend who shares reading ideas with me and has a number of grandsons.

  1. Here in Durham (UK not North Carolina) our small town is dominated by the university and the Cathedral. It doesn’t help that we are a medieval town and the road up to the Cathedral where all the graduation ceremonies are held and many of the students live is single track controlled by traffic lights. When it’s graduation I just stay out of town….. :)

    1. Sounds like a great idea. I try. Our little community doesn’t even qualify as a town and except for a convenience store with gas pumps and a post office, we lack any other shopping or services, so if we need something, we either fight the crowd or go to Walmart in the other directions and I am opposed to supporting that corporate blight on America. I love that I have a reader in the UK.

  2. Our village has nothing other than a very active community association and village hall and a thriving church. We have no English pub and no shop, we did have a post office in our castle, but it was closed under the post office cuts scheme….. It is only a short drive to Durham, but you have to drive. We are 2 miles from a bus stop and the bus goes every 30 minutes. It’s tough for youngsters. But they are now driving and I cannot imagine living anywhere else.

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